Blanka Pesja

Senior Art Educator - Conservatorium - Amsterdam University of the Arts

Odile, debut album review.

A Mesmerizing Genie.

From the hundred or so CDs my students have given me over the years I’ve never felt compelled to write a public review, until now. A true original work has been handed to me this summer after the exams. However, being the critical teacher I am, the humble cover annoys me, it does the music no justice. Like any precious gem it would need the right socket, a framework that brings out the light at first glance.

black swan

Next the name Odile itches: a prison from which there seems to be no escape; possessed by literature, music, visuals, chained by the centre figure of Pyotr Tchaikovsky’s ballet, the black swan. Can it be more obvious and explicit before we even hear one note?

Aah but then comes the music and all is forgotten. To begin with this album sounds really good. A first requirement for me to keep on listening. That wall of bass obstructs the auditive view here and there, the vocals are left hanging dry in the wind some moments. I hear it, and more, but it never destroys what is created by the unit as a whole. The order of songs is perfect,  meandering between the shades, never too dark or too heavy to fall off the canvas. Never tiring the listener away from the path.

Most of all, you know a creative work by its inspiring effect. Imagination is contagious.

dryads

Forget Odile. Who is this creature luring her listeners into her sphere from which there is no return? A seductress, there’s no doubt about it, but which one? As I follow her spell I think I might know her, a name rests at the tip of my tongue.

Is it my childhood Rusalka forever desiring, forever drowning or another Bohemian tree spirit mesmerizing the wanderers?

celticwoman_0

Or is it a Celtic warrior or goddess, a fortune teller gazing in her crystal ball. A Greek dryad or siren?

the-crystal-ball-johnWaterhouse-sk-688po1

No worn out feminine platitudes please, they are useless. She is all and none, she is the unknown genie.

odille

She guides me like a firefly into a world beyond this one. There are insects, trees, flowers, an unsettling rainforest with whispers and shadows and soft squeaking hinges (or am I imagining things). So I am not in a rainforest, I must be in an apple tree orchard surrounded by meadows, listening to Catherine explaining to herself why Heathcliff and she can not be together, while a gate behind her slowly opens.

 

Or a French idelorm001p1door softly closes as Marion Delorne plays her lute and sings to her poet lover who scribbles away in the late afternoon in the golden glow of her bold boudoir before poverty gets her.

Sai JinhuaSmaller yet, I am in a smoke filled room where the door is closed to an analgesic reddish-brown, heavy scented juice of the poppy. Where the spirit of Sai Jinhua sings while her pipe steadily smolders her chaise longue.  Her white face still un-invested. True to the vocal’s stubborn detachment. As a narrator, just a detailed observant. The red lanterns long ago diminished.

 

redlanterns2(Raise the Red Lantern by Zhang Yimou, 1991)

She is a genie, seemingly fragile yet determent. There is no escaping her strong hold. She and her musicians create landscape after landscape in which the listener keeps heading for the next bend and the next and the next while she always keeps her distance. This is her strength and her weakness, her Achilles heel. We need to connect at some point in time and space. Some moment we need to get to know her or let her go.

Next album will tell us what she decides. She knows that. In her last song she turns around and appears up in your face, her mouth almost touches your ear; she is on your left, on your right, above and in front of you all at once. Although still untouchable, this might be a promise of what will come, what might be possible. This is her first step to approach us directly. Will it be her last? Coming closer it might as well serve as a farewell before she vanishes forever. And suddenly I remember, she must be the dream of the dessert gypsy coming through the lions lips.

the-sleeping-gypsy(La Bohémienne Endormie by Henri Rousseau, 1897)

This is not an album to spin when you need to do chords, attend to others or manage stuff. It rather fits those long summer nights when you roll around sweaty and breath doesn’t seem to come easy. It might suit you right after a high summer storm when the last raindrops unexpectedly and a-rhythmically roll from soaked leaves. A misty autumn afternoon would also do, when the grey covers the horizon and a chill crawls under your door. Draw the curtains, light candles, leave your baggage at the door. Let your dress or attire slip silk-like from your shoulders, lay down, close your eyes and prepare like you would for a cleansing, a purge. Let the genie guide you, follow her flow, take the stepping stones in her painted river one by one as she displays her polished words gently, like colorful marbles gently dropped in the patient sand. The lyrics unfold like a tea ceremony; mysterious in their slow, deliberate intention.  At the end the river empties itself in the moon dominated sea while she wants you to know: “Some flowers are picked in vain.”

Original and unique. An exquisite musical journey.

Odile: Songs& lyrics by Josephine van Schaik / co-written by Timon Persoon & Annemarie van den Born. Produced by Josephine and Timon. Mixed by Sonny Groeneveld / mastered by Tom Tukker.

Listen to it here:

https://open.spotify.com/album/5pQwE14aoT0eKEvz4NObtd
https://itunes.apple.com/be/album/odile/id1111106781?l=nl

Check their tour dates here:

https://www.facebook.com/OdileBand

Muziekwedstrijd, succes is een collectieve afspraak. Interview met Angela Groothuizen. (nl)

Podcast interview met Angela Groothuizen (click here)

Transcript of interview with Angela Groothuizen.

Angela Groothuizen: singer, artist, television personality, juror of Xfactor, The voice of Holland, The voice kids, Holland’s got talent and many more.

Blanka Pesja: senior art educator, researcher master art educations

BP: Mijn gast van vandaag is Angela Groothuizen. Het zou een hele podcast uur kunnen duren alles op te sommen dat Angela gedaan heeft in haar succesvolle carrière en zeer energieke leven.

Voor mijn onderzoek naar competitie in kunsteducatie, en dan met name muziekeducatie, beperk ik me tot het noemen van de kwaliteiten die haar bij uitstek tot een ervaringsdeskundige maken. Zij heeft muziek gestudeerd, zij heeft zelf aan wedstrijden meegedaan, ze heeft prijzen gewonnen, ze heeft gecoacht en daarnaast heeft ze in heel veel jury’s gezeten.

Angela werd bekend als zangeres van de Dolly Dots, een groep die in 1988 werd opgeheven, waarna Angela een paar jaar muziek ging studeren en begon met liedjes te schrijven voor onder andere Kinderen voor Kinderen. Angela zelf won de Annie M.G. Schmidtprijs 2012 voor het nummer ‘Vinkeveen’, samen met tekstschrijver Jan Beuving en componist Nico Brandsen. Nico maakt samen met mij deel uit van het docententeam van de popopleiding van het conservatorium van Amsterdam. Angela en Nico ontvingen vier keer platina voor hun Sinterklaas meezingboek. Ook dat reken ik tot het winnen van een prijs. De klassieke liedjes zijn opgefunkt door Nico, teksten zijn gemoderniseerd door Jan Beuving. Vanaf voorjaar 2016 heeft Angela plaatsgenomen in de jury van Holland’s got Talent. Later was ze ook op televisie te zien als jurylid van The Voice of Holland. De jurerende rol had ze naar eigen zeggen met alle liefde nog een derde keer willen vervullen, maar het is ook goed om andere dingen te doen. “Het moet allemaal geen trucje worden.”

Dat vind ik een bijzonder leuke typerende quote en ook zeer toepasselijk voor mijn thema.

 

Om nog even een indruk te geven hoeveel ervaring Angela heeft met het jureren van wedstrijden, hier even een lijst. Jurypanels waar Angela in gezeten heeft zijn: Toppop Yeah (teamcaptain); Steracteur-Sterartiest (jurylid); Ranking the Stars (deelneemster); Let’s Dance (jurylid); X Factor (jurylid); The Voice of Holland (jurylid en coach); The Voice Kids (jurylid en coach); de Vrienden van Amstel zingen Kroonjuwelen (panellid); Beat the Best (jurylid); Mag ik u kussen? (kandidaat); De Beste Zangers van Nederland (deelneemster); It Takes Two (jurylid,); en Holland’s got Talent (jurylid). Ongelofelijk, Angela.
AG: Ja, maar ik heb ook vooral vroeger… Ik ben op mijn vierentwintigste had ik Roberto Jacketti & the Scooters geproduceerd. Dat was toentertijd de populairste groep. En toen begon het al met dat ze wilden dat ik bij de Harpen kwam jureren. En ik ben één van de oprichters van de BV Popprijs, wat nu de Popprijs is, daar heb ik ook jaren gejureerd. De Grote Prijs van Nederland in het begin heb ik een aantal jaren gejureerd, dus ik heb eigenlijk heel veel muziek gejureerd. En er zitten hier ook een paar programma’s bij waarbij ik gewoon een onderdeel ben van het programma. Ik heb zelf nooit meegedaan aan wedstrijden eerlijk gezegd. (Angela won wel in april 2013 de Annie M.G. Schmidt-prijs 2012 voor het nummer Vinkeveen, samen met tekstschrijver Jan Beuving en componist Nico Brandsen)

.
BP: In ieder geval uit deze hele lijst… mag ik hieruit concluderen dat je jureren leuk vindt en dat je sowieso een voorstander bent van muziekwedstrijden? Is dat zo?

AG: Nou, ik vind jureren echt wel een heel leuk baantje. Het is sowieso voor op televisie is het voor mij een manier om mijn geld te verdienen zodat ik mijn eigen vrije werk in het theater kan maken. Het gaat me heel makkelijk af. En dat komt toch wel door de ervaring die ik heb. Ze zeggen als je iets tienduizend uur doet, dan ben je ervaren. Nou, ik heb dit echt al heel veel meer gedaan. Het kost me ook helemaal geen moeite om wat ik vind en mijn emoties te scheiden. Dus als ik iemand niet perse leuk vind of zo, kan ik toch heel goed zien wat die persoon heeft gepresteerd.

BP: Je kijkt dan wat ‘koeler’ naar de kwaliteiten van de persoon?

AG: Ik kijk altijd naar de kwaliteiten. Ik kijk vooral met jureren ook altijd naar wat is iemand zijn kwaliteit en hoe heeft die persoon het op dit moment gedaan? Soms stijgen mensen boven zichzelf uit. En dat is altijd prachtig om te zien, en als je dat één keer gevoeld hebt, dan weet je dat je dat altijd zou kunnen nastreven bij elk optreden. Je tweede vraag is?
BP: Ben je voorstander van muziekwedstrijden?

AG: De één wel, de ander niet. Er zijn echt heel duidelijk mensen waarvan ik zeg: “Nou, je zou dit kunnen winnen, je hebt er niets bij te winnen, ik zou het niet doen.” Maar het leuke is, mensen vragen altijd advies en luisteren nooit. Dus ze gaan toch hun eigen weg. En dat is ook goed, want zo… Je leert het toch alleen maar door dingen te doen. Ik vind eigenlijk, muziek is natuurlijk eigenlijk niet helemaal iets om in een wedstrijdvorm te gieten, en toch is het over de hele wereld waanzinnig populair.
Ik weet dat mijn mede-Dolly Dot Ria – zij is in 2009 overleden – die was als kind werd die, ging die altijd naar alle talentenjachten en Stuif Eens In, dat… Nou, ik heb die behoefte zelf nooit gehad. Ik vond het ook eng om beoordeeld te worden.
En zij had daar helemaal geen last van, en daardoor was zij ook veel stressbestendiger dan dat ik was.

Dus ja, het hoeft niet maar het kan wel en het is een fantastische manier… (als je het dus even trekt naar wat televisie is, maar ook naar de Grote Prijs van Nederland)…het is een fantastische manier om jezelf te tonen. Laat jezelf maar zien, want in één keer bereik je zo’n grote massa. En als je meedoet aan programma’s als Holland’s Got Talent of de X Factor of The Voice, dat gaat ook nog eens via Youtube de hele wereld over.
Het wordt door de hele wereld bekeken, door de mensen die daarvan houden. Dus het zou zomaar kunnen dat dat een fantastische etalage is, net zoals tegenwoordig het Songfestival weer een etalage is.

BP: Ja, inderdaad.

AG: Ik bedoel, als we het nou hebben over een muziekwedstrijd die nou toch, zeg maar cultureel gezien in alle hoeken van de business heeft gezeten, van smakeloos tot prachtig, is het toch wel een voorbeeld van iets wat heel lang een groot succes is. Mensen vinden het spannend.

In het Arabische deel van de wereld is The Voice en Idols enorm groot. Het is iets voor kinderen om naar uit te kijken: Als ik dat doe, dan zou ik mijn leven kunnen redden. Voor sommige mensen is het ook echt een noodzaak om daaraan mee te doen.

BP: Heb je trouwens een voorkeurpanel of een voorkeurjury welke je het leukste vond om te doen, of welke je het beste vindt werken of een andere kwaliteit?

AG: Nou, het is altijd… Mensen hebben heel veel kritiek altijd op Gordon, maar hij is een heel erg goed jurylid. En hij neemt wel altijd zijn eigen stemming mee, dat is wat mensen er dan op tegen hebben, maar hij is een heel goed jurylid. En wij zijn met z’n tweeën kunnen heel goed. Ik vond de jury van de X Factor met Gordon en met Eric van Tijn en met mij en met Stacey die als rare eend in de bijt daaraan meedeed, vond ik een heel goeie jury.

BP:

Door de diversiteit?

AG: Ja, ook wel met… Ja, en ook wel dat Eric als songwriter en als producer, en dan Stacey als jonkie die eigenlijk gewoon ‘bluntly’ haar mening gaf. En dan Gordon als artiest en ik een beetje zo van alles er tussendoor. Dat was een goeie… En nu met Holland’s Got Talent is dit misschien wel de beste jury. Dus Gordon, dat ben ik, dat is Chantal Jansen die toch ook echt uit het theater komt en uit de danswereld komt en ook nog eens iemand is die zichzelf echt kan wegcijferen. En dan heb je Dan Karaty, een danscoach, één van de beste juryleden die ik ooit gehoord heb en als presentator Johnny de Mol. Ik geloof dat wij wel een heel goed team met elkaar zijn.

BP: Als ik je goed hoor, dan zeg je aan de ene kant dat je zelf weg kunnen cijferen een kwaliteit is.
AG: Heel belangrijk is, ja.
BP: En aan de andere kant ongezouten in één keer je persoonlijke mening erin gooien ook een kwaliteit is. Het lijkt bijna tegenstrijdig.

AG: Daarom is de samenstelling van de jury zo belangrijk.

BP: Dat je die beiden hebt?

AG: Ja, dat je dat beiden hebt. Kijk, ik vind dat het altijd moet gaan om degene die op het podium staat. Bij televisie moeten we ook televisie maken, dus ze vragen heel vaak: “Ga maar schieten, wij monteren het wel.” Als het live is dan moet je heel goed nadenken hoe je gaat schieten, dat je het kort en bondig schiet. Ik vind dat het altijd wel moet blijven gaan over degene die daar staat. In televisie is dat, ja daar moet je soms ook de tijd nemen om televisie te maken. Maar nooit ten koste van het talent.

BP: Dat begrijp ik. Ik ben vooral erg benieuwd naar je werkwijze als coach, en dan met name van kinderen. Ik zie jouw coaching activiteiten namelijk op het level van docentschap. Je leert de kinderen en jonge mensen waar je mee werkt toch nieuwe vaardigheden. Mijn vragen zullen zich dan ook richten op jou als coachdocente, juist in je hoedanigheid van jurylid, iemand die weet wat er van de kandidaten verwacht wordt en daar naartoe werkt. Zie ik dat juist zo? Werk je zo? Doelgericht?

AG: Ik heb mezelf nog nooit als docent gezien.

Ik stuur ze ook altijd door naar mensen waarvan ik denk dat die technisch beter kunnen uitleggen hoe… Ik weet dus helemaal hoe die stem werkt en hoe dat gaat, maar ik heb natuurlijk nooit geleerd om daarin les te geven.

Wat ik doe, is dat die enorme lange ervaring die ik nou eenmaal heb… Ik ben heel vaak op mijn neus gegaan, ik heb alle fouten al een keer gemaakt. Dus wat ik doe met een kind, vooral met jonge mensen, dat zijn die kinderen van The Voice Kids, die zijn dan tussen de elf en de veertien jaar, daar is al een enorm verschil. Die kinderen van elf laat ik zien: “Laat zien wat je kunt.” Die zijn helemaal onbevangen, dat probeer ik daar te houden. “Dit is het schat, en geniet ervan en wees wie je bent, je bent prachtig.”

Sommige kinderen die doen dingen die afleiden van hun zang. Dus dat kan met handen zijn, dat kan hoe ze staan. Daar kan ik kleine trucjes geven, van sta stil. Of als kinderen heel erg nerveus zijn, heel erg kwetsbaar zijn, dan geef ik ze wel een oefening waarin ik ze zeg: “Speel nou eens iemand die heel erg, heel erg in zichzelf gelooft, iemand waar je eigenlijk een beetje een hekel aan zou hebben. Kijk eens wat ik kan…” Dan zijn we één op één en niemand die dat ziet en dan moeten ze… Dat kind dat helemaal zo zingt, laat ik dan ‘whawhawha’ doen. Dus even de tegenbeweging van voel eens even wat er dan gebeurt. En wat er dan gebeurt is soms zo ontroerend dat mensen opeens voelen dat ze dat ook hebben. Of dat ze opeens merken: “Hé, o, dat kan ook.” En dat doe ik ook andersom. Mensen met veel blabla laat ik helemaal… Ik heb wel eens een jongen met veel blabla laten dansen als een klein meisje in een veld. Hij zegt: “Dat kan niet.” Ik zeg: “Doe het nou, niemand ziet het, niemand ziet het schat.” En die ging trippelen, trippelen, trippelen. Als een klein huppelend meisje liet ik hem bijna zingen. En die begon heel hard te huilen. Die begon heel hard te huilen toen hij dat deed. Die kwam ergens, en die heeft natuurlijk blijkbaar al die jaren iets op moeten houden of zo. En dus dat… Dat werkt wel. Maar heel vaak kijk ik alleen maar wat ze doen en dan zeg ik wat me opvalt. En probeer eens dat, en ik versta dat woord niet. Wat zing je nou eigenlijk? Waar gaat de tekst volgens jou over? En bij kinderen is zingen vaak eng en ze hebben geen idee. Dus dat is een andere manier dan met volwassenen. Een volwassene pak ik veel harder aan.

Dus die… De kandidaten bij The Voice, die pakte ik pittig aan. Maar die waren vaak ook, stonden niet meer open om te leren.

BP: Je merkt daar echt een verschil hè?

AG: Ja. Dus degene waar ik het meest van hou, dat is Shary-An, die heeft nu weer een prachtige single uit. Die was echt een kind van de straat en die, ja die stond helemaal open, die kon helemaal… Daar kon je alles mee doen. En die had echt een stem, het was nog niet altijd zuiver, maar het was een persoonlijkheid en de stem die je ziet, die is gebleven. Ja, en Niels Geuzenbroek is natuurlijk ook gebleven. En Aron Nijhof was er al en die is eigenlijk ook gebleven. Het zijn er een paar die het goed gedaan hebben. Maar des te jonger, des te beter kunnen ze nog… Dus daar keek ik op een gegeven moment ook naar, van kan ik jou nog wat leren, of denk jij dat je het al weet?

BP: Ja. Daarom vertrouw ik erop dat je toch door de jaren heen een docentenoog of –oor hebt ontwikkeld, ook al zou jij het zelf misschien niet in een didactische methode samenvatten. Maar ik hoor aan hoe je ingrijpt en hoe je dingen verzint voor je studenten, daar ben ik dus heel erg benieuwd naar. Mijn eerste vraag voor mijn onderzoek zou dan ook zijn: Wat is het positieve en negatieve effect van de competitie, dus we zijn in een wedstrijd bezig, voor het leren tijdens het coachen?

AG: Nou, als ik even uitga bijvoorbeeld The Voice, dat was qua competitie zwaar. Daar ging, de dagen waren lang, ze konden geen kant op. Dat was bij de X Factor ook, ze waren vaak binnen. Er werd veel van ze verwacht, ze moesten soms uren wachten. Het werden wel vrienden maar ze voelden opeens de druk, ze kregen op een begeven moment ook allemaal iets paranoïde, namelijk het programma vind mij zeker niet meer leuk en die heeft een betere plaat of die mag dat liedje zingen.
Terwijl ik daar nooit aanwijzingen over heb gehad dat dat zo werkte. Maar dan zei ik altijd: “Als je op dat pad gaat schat, verlies je.”
Blijf nou heel dicht bij jezelf, het enige wat ik altijd zei van: “Focus je heel rustig op jezelf”, en ik probeerde altijd… Daar ben ik geloof ik beter in dan wie dan ook: Wat is jouw kern, wie ben jij?

BP: Juist.

AG: Ik geloof dat het gaat niet om hard en hoog zingen of kijk eens wat ik allemaal kan, dat vind ik zo oninteressant. Ik wil kijken van wie is Blanka? Wie is…? Wie ben jij? Wat heb jij in te brengen wat de rest niet is? Want jij bent uniek. Dus je probeert dat van die mensen probeer ik eruit te halen, dat ze dat één keer voelen van als ik dat doe, dan ben ik anders dan anderen. Uiteindelijk onder de druk van de wedstrijd gaan ze heel vaak toch in hun oude trucje vallen.

BP: Ja. Precies, dat kan ik me voorstellen.

AG: Maar sommige mensen niet. Ik heb een fantastisch voorbeeld aan Adriaan, die kon helemaal niet zo goed zingen. Grote persoonlijkheid, zestien jaar was hij bij de X Factor. Zong ‘Ik vind je lekker’, zong hij en hij kon helemaal niet zo goed… Maar hij begeleidde zichzelf op de piano en ik dacht: “Ik neem hem mee.” En ik dacht die komt nooit de tweede ronde door. Nou, die kwam uiteindelijk wel in de live shows omdat hij steeds alles opzoog wat ik zei. Hij is tweede geworden. Mijn andere kandidaat is eerste geworden, ik had één en twee heb ik toen gewonnen. Dat was ook uniek, dat was nog nooit gebeurd bij de X Factor.
En hij is inmiddels, hij zit, hij is de toetsenman van Ron D, dus hij is serious talent, hij gaat heel goed, hij was aangenomen op het conservatorium. Maar je ziet dat die MBO kinderen heel vaak blijven hangen bij de HBO, dat is toch net teveel in het hoofd.

Het was zo makkelijk om hem… Hij pakte gewoon alles aan, hij was heel slim en aan Adriaan en Shary-An daar heb ik het diepste gevoel bij , omdat ik het gevoel heb dat ik ze echt iets gebracht heb.

BP: Welke soort kandidaten hebben veel baat bij de competitie tijdens jouw coaching traject zeg maar en welke kandidaten lijden onder het feit dat ze in een competitie zijn?

AG: Dat is een interessante vraag. Want heel vaak zie ik dat pas later, als het al zo ver is. Ik zie het ook soms wel denk ik al: “Dit is niet voor jou schat.”

BP: Maar kan je die, ook al zie je het later, heb je nu een beetje inzicht wat voor karakteristieken dat zijn?

AG: Mensen uit een goed gezin met liefdevolle ouders waar zelfvertrouwen vanaf het begin erin gezoend is, die kunnen veel hebben.
En de kinderen, de straatkinderen, Shary-An komt bijvoorbeeld van de Jeugdzorg, die kon ook heel veel hebben. Dus die…

BP: Een soort weerbaarheid.
AG: Ja, die was weerbaar omdat die in die Jeugdzorg hele liefdevolle mensen heeft getroffen. Maar mensen die uit een gezin komen waarvan die vader of de moeder zei: “Je moet dit of dat”, die zijn heel, altijd klaar voor een wedstrijd. En op een begeven moment hou je dat niet vol.

Je moet het spel kunnen zien. “Joh, lieverd, het is ook maar een wedstrijd, het is niet je hele leven.”
BP: Nee.
AG: En het enige wat je moet, het enige wat ik heel belangrijk vind is dat ze zuiver zingen. Want als je één keer vals zingt, dat achtervolgt je je hele leven op Youtube.

BP: Toch weer terug naar de techniek breng je ze dan.

AG: De techniek is wel belangrijk. En ook dit lied staat in… Sommige mensen kunnen fantastisch zingen, en als ze dan een hommage zingen en die is in mineur dan hoor je ze de mist ingaan. Ja, en die gaan dan ook in de finale de mist in. Ik heb het nu een paar keer gezien.
Mensen die heel veel riedeltjes kunnen, heel hoog en laag kunnen, grote ambities hebben en die toch altijd die ene interval altijd fout zingen. En dan kan je dat honderdduizend keer met ze oefenen, interval, interval, en dan gaat het onder druk weer fout. Want dat innerlijke oor, dat weet van wat is nou de toonaard, waar zit de tonica, dat voelen ze niet.
Ja, daar ben ik nu wel beter in om die eruit te halen hoor.
Die neem ik niet meer mee, want dat is gewoon niet goed. Die kunnen beter gewoon via bandjes zichzelf… Ja, je moet toch wel heel muzikaal zijn als je wil overleven.

BP: Hoe sta je persoonlijk tegenover competitie in muziekonderwijs?

AG: Ja, kijk muziekonderwijs in Nederland, in een tijd waarin iedereen zijn passie wil volgen, zijn droom wil volgen… Waar ik voor ben, je kunt altijd nog een serieuze baan hebben, ga eerst nou maar eens achter je droom aan. Ook de competitie begint al bij de vooropleiding van ook hier deze geweldige… conservatorium Amsterdam ben ik enorm fan van.
Echt enorm. Ook van de Herman Brood academie, MBO, ben ik enorm fan van.

BP: Hele goeie dingen komen daar vandaan.
AG: Komt enorm veel vanaf. Maar het is een competitie. Om erop te komen, moet je eerst wel laten zien wat je kunt en dan moet je wel iets anders zijn dan wat er al is.

BP: Dus je ziet de school eigenlijk al meteen als competitie?

AG: Ja, maar kijk op het moment dat je de bühne op gaat, moet je bereid zijn al helemaal klaar te staan als een wedstrijd. In het begin zeker, als je nog niet weet… Ik bedoel, ik ben bijna zevenenvijftig, ik sta op allerlei soorten podia, ik denk dat ik van alle mensen in Nederland het meest verschillende podia heb gespeeld. Dus van kleine zalen tot de braderie, tot Ahoy en weet ik veel wat.
Altijd moet je die spanning voelen, daar zitten mensen, je moet op en je moet alles, je moet rechtop staan en je gaat. En dan na vijf minuten kan je in de ontspanning. Dus dat is per definitie al wat een topsporter heeft als hij in de startblokken staat vind ik. Als je te ontspannen op gaat, dat zou je kunnen opbreken. Dus eigenlijk hoort het bij je wil dat mensen naar je kijken, je wil dat mensen, dat ze uit je hand eten.

BP: Gegrepen worden door wat je doet.

AG: Ja, je wil ze toch verleiden. Dan zou je toch echt wel een beetje in de modus moeten staan hoor. En dat is bij popmuziek, dat zie je ook, dat is wel weer grappig, dat vind ik wel eens hier missen bij het conservatorium, dat ik ze teveel in hun hoofd zie.

BP: Of dat het lang duurt voordat ze erin komen. De eerste twee of drie songs of zo. Dat is veel te lang.

AG: Ja, ik zie toch heel vaak dat een optreden, dat het echt alleen maar die muziek is maar de toekomst vraagt meer. Wat ga ik doen als ik eenmaal opkom? Hoe ga ik…? Ik zie bijvoorbeeld mensen die hier afgestudeerd zijn, mijn favoriete groep My Baby, fantastische talenten, geweldige talenten. Ze spelen Paradiso, ik dacht: “Daar ben ik geïnteresseerd in.” Want wat zie ik? In Paradiso zijn Nederlanders altijd bloednerveus. En ja hoor, ik zie ze opkomen en ik denk: “Daar gaat hij al.” Paradiso klinkt altijd ongemakkelijk, het is ongemakkelijk. En ik zag ze allemaal nerveus zijn. Ik heb het later met ze besproken, toen zeiden ze: “Ja, klopt. Het ging gewoon niet zo.” Ze waren gewoon niet zoals anders. Ze waren evengoed steengoed, maar ze waren niet aan het flowen. Dus dat is ook iets wat je moet leren, en eigenlijk moet dat geleerd worden op school, van wat gebeurt er nou, ben je voorbereid?
Wat ik doe bij mijn kids voordat ze opgaan live op de zender met drie miljoen mensen die kijken, of soms twee miljoen
BP: Gigantische getallen.

AG: Ze zijn heel nerveus en dat gaf ik dan ook altijd door aan de coach, de zangcoach waar ze ook bij zijn. Ik was heel één op één altijd met de zangcoach. Dan zei ik: “Luister, voordat ze opgaan, let bij die even op dat, even pff pff, pff pff. Dat de adem weer laag zit.” En een andere zei ik: “Voordat je opgaat, wil ik dat je denkt aan seks.” Dat is dan iemand die dat nog helemaal niet had in zijn liederen. Het hoort bij popmuziek, hoort seksualiteit op de een of andere manier.
Een ander zei ik: “Ik wil dat voordat je opgaat je ogen dichtdoet en denkt aan het gelukkigste moment, dan vroeg ik eerst wat was een heel gelukkig moment in je leven, en dan vertellen ze iets, en dan zeg ik: “Dan ga je terug en dan ga je dat, dan ga je dat beeld weer voor je krijgen.” Want dan ga je namelijk met een glimlach op, dan ga je met een gevoel op van ik was ooit eens gelukkig en ik neem dat mee. En dat is die eerste hobbel al. En ik heb dat geleerd omdat ik zelf zo’n ontzettende stresskip was vroeger.
Dan zag ik mezelf op televisie met zo’n vertrokken bek, dan dacht ik: “Groothuizen, what the f**k?” En dus ik kan het alleen maar doorgeven omdat ik zo vaak diezelfde fouten nog steeds maak ook.

BP: Welke aanpassingen aan wedstrijden zou je graag implementeren als jij het voor het zeggen had? Wat mag er van jou veranderen?

AG: Dat hoge, hard en hoog en kijk eens ik kan Sia zingen. Ik vind het zo oninteressant. En daar zit bijvoorbeeld The Voice veel meer op, kijk eens hoe, imponeren op alleen maar effect.
Ik ben natuurlijk al een tijdje uit The Voice. Ik vind dat heel veel dingen nu alleen maar steeds op effect gaan.
En ik vind het effect, ja dat is wel leuk, dat moet je ook wel kunnen, maar daar moet je… Dat is zo oninteressant. Dat is een beetje de man die zijn spierballen laat zien. Kijk eens wat ik allemaal heb. Terwijl je gewoon iemand wil zien.

BP: Persoonlijkheid.

AG: En je wilt geraakt worden. En niet alleen… Maar dat komt ook, als iemand een hele hoge toon zingt, dan gaat het publiek dan gaat iedereen klappen en schreeuwen. Dus mensen denken nu dat dat ook zo hoort. Terwijl uiteindelijk dat is het niet.
Als je het echt wilt, als je het beroep wilt maken, dan zal je echt iets anders moeten leren.

BP: Een persoonlijke vraag: Ben jij een perfectionist?

AG: Ja en nee. Ik ben het wel, ik heb afgelopen week het een beetje moeilijk met mezelf gehad omdat ik twee weken terug de moeilijkste, de zwaarste week van mijn leven had. Ik had drie keer de Toppers met de Dolly Dots, ik had drie keer mijn eigen show met Nico in het land, ik had twee keer de Muzikale komedie waarin ik zit, een toneelstuk, en ik had twee keer Holland’s Got Talent. En dat allemaal in zeven dagen, dus ik schoot…

BP: Dat is echt topsport, ongelofelijk!

AG: Het kon ook echt niet, fysiek voor je stem bijna niet. En ik heb als een monnik theetjes gedronken, warm gezongen. Dus ik kon het aan, maar ik ging bij de Toppers die eerste avond voor zestigduizend mensen met nieuwe oortjes zonder soundcheck op met een bak herrie in mijn oor. Ik kon mezelf niet horen. Ik heb behoorlijk matig gezongen die avond, daar heb ik de pest over in.
Ik heb ook één voorstelling met Nico, daar was iedereen wel heel enthousiast over, maar dat is de eerste avond in De Kleine Komedie, waren Nico en ik te gespannen, daar heb ik de pest over in.
Dus dan heb ik eigenlijk, dan kijk ik naar die week en dan denk ik: “Ja, ik heb het volbracht en er zijn weinig mensen die dat hadden gekund”, maar ik ben dan heel ontevreden dat die eerste avond bij de Toppers, dat die niet goed was. En die staat natuurlijk op Youtube, dat snap je wel.
Dus dan ben ik wel een perfectionist, maar ik heb ook geleerd dat bij mij valt het meeste winst te halen uit de ontspanning als ik ga. Als ik ontspannen ben, dan ben ik beter. Dus in die Muzikale Komedie waarin ik nu speel met veertien actrices, dan kom ik op vanuit de zaal met ‘I’m so excited’ in de toonaard die ik eigenlijk niet zo goed kan zingen. Maar dat maakt niet uit en tussendoor moet je ook, en je hebt alleen maar zo’n saai microfoontje, geen monitors dus je moet het echt op techniek doen, en dan denk ik sta ik daar als een oud wijf sta ik daar die tekst ook nog eruit te gooien. Maar dan weet ik wel, dan ben ik degene die het eerste mijn spulletjes heeft klaarliggen, dubbelcheck check check, dat ik nooit een moment heb dat die joint die ik in mijn zak moet hebben waarmee ik moet spelen, dat ik nooit misgrijp.

BP: Dus de voorbereiding daar ben je secuur in.

AG: Mijn toneel hygiëne is een tien. Ja, een tien. En Nico is net zo, en toch gebeurt het ons wel. En dan kunnen wij dan gelukkig met al onze voorbereiding altijd door. Maar ja, Nico en ik zijn eigenlijk met z’n tweeën nog erger dan allebei alleen. Wij gaan tot en met de laatste show dingen veranderen.

BP: Blijven schaven.

AG: Ja. Erg hè? Ja.

BP: Met dat perfectionisme, heb je daar ook last van of baat bij, bij het coachen of het jureren?

AG: Soms zeg ik ook wel eens: “Goed is in dit geval goed genoeg.”

BP: Dus relativeren eigenlijk dan.
AG: Ja. Je moet relativeren. En wat ik ook altijd doe, als er kinderen… je hebt altijd van die kinderen die de hele tijd aandacht willen hebben van: “Ik ben zo nerveus, ik ben zo nerveus.” Ik zeg: “Ach schat, je bent niet je ouders kwijtgeraakt bij een vlucht uit Syrië, je zit niet in een vreselijk vluchtelingenkamp in, bij de grens van Macedonië, je hoeft niet in het bos ergens in de Kongo je vader af te slachten omdat je nou eenmaal te grazen bent genomen door een kinderleger. Hou effe op, je gaat een liedje zingen, dat vind je toch leuk?” Nou, daar waren ze helemaal…keken ze helemaal zo. En dat werkt wel. Dus dan ben ik soms provocatief aan het coachen.
Provocatief coachen voor sommige mensen zeg ik ook: “Luister, dat is ook zo, je kan het ook niet.” En dan kijken ze je helemaal aan, in één keer schieten ze eruit. Ik zeg: “Je kan het niet. Je gelooft er zelf niet eens in, dus moet ik je dan gaan vertellen dat je het kan? Ik denk ook dat het waarschijnlijk niet goed gaat vanavond.” Of wie vertelt me dat het wel goed gaat?” Nou, dan gaan ze nog even hard huilen en dan gaat het ’s avonds geweldig. Het gaat soms niet helemaal perfect, maar dan is er iets anders. Want wat is er mooier dan een optreden wat misschien niet helemaal perfect is, als het maar niet helemaal af is, is het vaak mooier. Maar wel met hele diepe emoties. Ja, dat zijn de optredens die we willen zien natuurlijk.

BP: Vergelijk jij wel eens kandidaten onderling tijdens het coachen? Van kijk eens naar die of vergeleken met die? In positieve of negatieve zin, en waarom?

AG: Nou, peer pressure is de beste, het beste wat je…

BP: Er staan ook heel veel ethische mensen op die zeggen: “Dat kan niet.”

AG: Ja, en toch is het zo.
BP: Je hebt er geen moeite mee, je doet het?

AG: Ik vind dat… Het eerste wat ik altijd zeg tegen de kinderen is, wat ik altijd deed met zeg maar de jongeren, maar ook met al mijn kinderen, dan heb je er zes of acht of twaalf of vijftien, die haalde ik altijd bij elkaar. Ik heb een huis in Vinkeveen, dat is een magische plek, daar haalde ik ze bij elkaar. Ik zeg: “Luister, ik ga jullie heel veel vertellen en jullie gaan heel vaak niet luisteren. Maar jullie gaan wel het meest van elkaar leren. Kijk naar elkaar, leer van elkaar.” En dan ga ik wel in de veiligheid van met elkaar zijn, ik zorg eerst dat die groep veilig is. Het zijn ook altijd een bepaald soort kinderen en mensen die altijd voor mij kiezen. Dus het is vaak ook de meest gezellige groep. Ik had altijd de leukste groepen waar de diepste vriendschappen uit kwamen. En ik weet dat bij Marco, en dat komt niet door Marco, maar daar was enorme rivaliteit. Dat heb ik eigenlijk nooit gehad.

BP: Ik hoorde van Nico ook dat jij heel zorgzaam bent. Dus in jouw huis, heel gastvrij en heel zorgzaam voor die kinderen.

AG: Veilig zijn, een soort moeder-energie. Ik ben best wel stoer maar ik heb dan blijkbaar toch een moeder-energie waardoor het veilig is. Dan zet ik ze in de kring en dan laat ik ze om de beurt voor elkaar optreden en ik laat ze dan ook die soms als het nodig is die oefening doen. En omdat het veilig is, werkt het bijna als een sensitivity training. En dan groeien ze en dan zijn ze heel veilig met elkaar. En dan worden ze beter door elkaar. Niet door mij, door elkaar. Dus ik geloof wel in peer pressure, alleen in een veilige omgeving.

BP: Gaan jouw kandidaten wel eens negatief onderling een competitie aan en hoe reageer jij daar dan op?

AG: Ik heb dat in mijn groepen niet, maar ik heb het wel eens gezien dat iemand heel aardig een sneer uitdeelde. “Toch knap hoor, dat je je dan nog zo staande houdt na die fout.” Dat soort dingen. En daar ben ik echt, dan ben ik meedogenloos tegen die persoon.
Dan zeg ik: “Zo, dus jij dacht dat ik dat niet hoor? Dat hoorde ik. En wat wil je eigenlijk zeggen, wat bedoel je er eigenlijk mee?” “Wat bedoel je eigenlijk?” “Nee, nee, nee.” “Jij zegt het, wat bedoel je?” En dan soms ook wel eens dat de andere coach zegt: “Wat was dat? Had je een briefing met mijn…?” Ik zeg: “Luister, die zit een beetje mijn kandidaat af te graaien, daar gaan we niet voor.” Of ik zeg: “Ik roep ze tot de orde.”
Ik vind, ja je moet altijd bedacht zijn op… Iedereen kent wel iemand die altijd jou probeert kleiner te maken.
Daar waarschuw ik ze ook voor.
Zorg dat er altijd mensen zijn, ook in je omgeving, thuis. Iedereen gaat anders doen, iedereen gaat zich met je bemoeien, iedereen komt met een mening, laat het van je afglijden. Want ze proberen je kleiner of groter te maken en je hebt aan beiden niets.
BP: Dus dat is een goede reactie. En in principe wat jij zegt, je krijgt er sowieso mee te maken in je leven, het gaat altijd gebeuren. Dus je kunt ze ook niet beschermen. Ik neem aan dat je ze ook weerbaar moet zien te maken.

AG: Weerbaarheid is één van de belangrijkste dingen. En je kunt weerbaar zijn en toch je kwetsbaarheid houden, snap je? Dat je het kunt laten zien op het podium dat is mooi, maar wees wel weerbaar. En laat je ook… En al die meningen, vooral die kandidaten van die programma’s die hebben zoveel meningen. Iedereen zegt: “Weet je, ik zag… Die jurk dat…” Of weet je, allemaal dingen waardoor ze altijd die grond onder hun voeten wordt weggeslagen. Dus het eerste wat ik tegen ze zeg van: “Luister naar niemand, luister naar mij, kom naar mij toe.”
Dat gebeurt dan natuurlijk wel, maar ze luisteren natuurlijk toch. Want we zijn namelijk kwetsbaar. En ik heb het ook nog steeds. Als mensen iets zeggen of ik zie iets op Youtube, dan denk ik ook ja, of een slecht… Of een recensie, dat je denkt: “Ja, hij heeft ook gelijk eigenlijk.” Weet je, dat houden we. Maar wij als performers, als muzikanten zijn nou eenmaal kwetsbaar. En als je daar, daar moet je mee om kunnen gaan. En dat probeer ik ze wel te leren.

BP: Zijn er al bij voorbaat de echte, ja gedoodverfde zeg je in het Nederlands, winners and loosers on your team? Hoe ga je om met die stigma’s

 

AG: Ik zeg heel vaak, ik zeg: “Luister, de kans is vrij klein dat je deze wedstrijd wint.”
Dat zeg ik wel. Maar je zit in de finale, dus jij gebruikt dit als een podium om jezelf te laten zien. En dan ga ik vertellen steeds van ja, maar jij schrijft natuurlijk je eigen liedjes en jij gaat je eigen… Dus ik verkoop ze ook aan het publiek.
Ik zeg ook tegen mensen: “Het zou zo maar kunnen zijn dat jij degene bent die zou kunnen winnen. Geen enkele fout moet je maken. Let op wat ik je zeg.”

BP: Dus je voert de druk dan eigenlijk op?

AG: Nou, ik waarschuw ze voor valkuilen. Ik ken alle gaten in de weg en ik weet ook waar ze kunnen ontstaan.
En ik zie soms ook mensen, je weet het toch niet hoor, want dat zeg ik ook heel vaak, ik zeg: “Jongens, het kan, je hebt gelukkig niet alles in de hand, het ligt ook nog eens bij het publiek. En succes is een collectieve afspraak”, zeg ik altijd.
Mensen die besluiten allemaal: “O, daar lopen we…” Mensen lopen allemaal achter elkaar aan. “Kijk, o dat…” En dan is er een kleine meerderheid of minderheid die zegt: “Ja, maar ik vind het wel interessant.” Dus succes is een collectieve afspraak.

BP: Mooie uitdrukking.

AG: Dus ik bereid ze voor en ik weet wel heel vaak wie zou kunnen winnen. Ik heb ook één keer gehad dat ik dacht: “Ja, die gaat winnen en die gaat het niet maken. Want dat is een zeurpiet.”

BP: Mensen moeten ook jou dan wel wat gunnen?

AG: Luister, als je een zeurpiet bent, dan ga je het niet redden in dit vak. Luister, voor jou twintigduizend anderen. Je moet echt niet denken dat jij het grote talent bent. Je moet gewoon aan de slag. Niet zeuren, werken.

BP: Heel mooi. Ik heb een song uitgekozen van jou en Nico waarvan jij de tekst hebt geschreven, wat ik heel thematisch toepasselijk vind: ‘Eeuwige Jeugd’.

 

 

Muzikaal Intermezzo: Eeuwige Jeugd

Zang en tekst: Angela Groothuizen

 

BP: Angela, wil jij iets zeggen over deze song?

AG: Het leuke is dat ik dit lied kreeg opgestuurd door een blogger van Zapp of blog.nl die altijd over muziek blogt. En die zegt: “Ik hoor jou dit zingen.” Ik vond het helemaal te gek. Maar ik dacht, het was een Italiaans lied, moet ik het dan vertalen, ik heb geen idee waar het Italiaanse lied over ging. Heb ik ook niet gevraagd, En ik heb gewoon ook wel echt een jaar lang aan die tekst gewerkt, dan weer daar een woordje, dan weer daar een zinnetje. En uiteindelijk werd het de titelsong van mijn vorige programma, Eeuwige Jeugd. En ook de titelsong van ons laatste album. En ik heb nu de ballad-versie met Nico en die is eigenlijk nog ietsjes mooier. Dus die komt ook nog, die gaan we ook nog opnemen.

BP: O geweldig.

Hoe begeleid je een potentiele winnaar naar een wedstrijd toe? Dus anders dan de mensen waarvan je denkt: “Die gaan het toch niet redden?”

AG: Nee, maar die krijgen wel dezelfde behandeling.

BP: OK, dus je maakt geen onderscheid?

AG: Nee, ik maak geen onderscheid. Maar uiteindelijk blijf je met steeds minder over, want het is een competitie, er vallen mensen af. Uiteindelijk blijf je met je kerngroep over. Ik weet de studio’s waar ze dan heel vaak dagen zitten. Daar zijn wat banken en daar vervelen ze zich. Dus ik zeg altijd: “Hier zijn opblaasbedjes, probeer rust te pakken, probeer niet de hele dag met iedereen door die gangen te zingen dat je straks je stem kwijt bent. Probeer je te focussen op de dag van de uitzending.” Vooral die live uitzendingen zijn heel zwaar. “Ga liggen, ga ook in stilte met elkaar, ga niet de hele tijd muziek op je oor. Geef je oren rust.” Dat soort dingen doe ik dan, en vooral met de winnaar probeer ik, en dat is natuurlijk bij iedereen anders, focus, focus, focus. Denk aan het lied, zie elk, vooral aan het einde merk je dat ze minder goed nog die teksten opnemen omdat ze moe worden. De harde schijf is vol.

BP: De tekstoverdracht…
AG: Ze worden steeds, naarmate het belangrijker wordt zijn ze uitgeputter. En dan ga ik zitten: “Wat zing je? Neem die tekst, zie het voor je. Wat zie je voor je?” Dus dan onthouden ze ook die teksten beter. Ik zeg: “Op het moment dat je heel nerveus bent, ga in de tekst…. sitting on the dock of the bay…. zie jezelf zitten daar. Watching the tide… wat zie je? O je ziet het getij komen, in en uit. Voel het, zie het voor je. Ga helemaal in je eigen film. Ga in de tekst… I’ve been loving you, aan wie denk je dan? Too long… Zie het voor je.” En heel vaak kunnen ze dan net zichzelf op tijd wegtrekken voor een potentieel gat in de weg. Dat werkt heel goed, dat werkt dan ook echt wel bij de winnaars.

BP: Right, daar is dat onderscheid al eigenlijk?

AG: Ja, ja, ja. En dat wil niet zeggen dat degenen die niet de winnaar is niet volgend jaar de winnaar kan zijn. Het is een momentopname, dat zeg ik ook altijd.

 

BP: Hoe vang je een verliezer van een wedstrijd op?

AG: Als het helemaal is misgegaan: “Nou wat gebeurde er? Dit en dat? Hebben we allemaal wel eens.” “Ja, maar nu hebben drie miljoen mensen me gezien.” “Maar goed, dit gebeurt je nooit meer.”

 

BP: Dus relativeren of troosten?
AG: Ja, een beetje troost. Relativeren. Hé luister, dit heb je meegemaakt.
Dit heb je meegemaakt, gaat je nooit meer gebeuren. En later ja, het is… We maken het allemaal wel eens mee, Blanka, dat je denkt…

BP: Vertel mij wat.

AG: Dit heb ik niet goed gedaan. Nou ja, lekker belangrijk. We zijn allemaal feilbaar.

BP: Ja. Dan een vraag die echt wel uit het onderwijs komt, maar ik denk dat we daar wel raakvlakken hebben: Hoe implementeer je de wedstrijd in de rest van je coaching programma? Dus je ziet iets wat er moet gebeuren met één van de kandidaten. En ja, wat voor element is daar dan die wedstrijd nog voor?

AG: Het heeft vaak te maken met wie de persoon is. Wat ze zingen op dat moment, hoe moeilijk dat lied is en hoe graag ze het willen of niet. Dus als ze een lied echt niet willen, dan ben ik de coach die regelt dat ze een ander lied krijgen.
Maar ja, het is soms ook moeilijk. Dan kijk ik wat zit er verder in het programma zit. Wie zit er voor jou? Zie je het voor je? Dat is een en al energie, dus we gaan hier voor die ballad en je gaat hem heel ingetogen zingen. Dus dan heb je de tegenstelling.

BP: Je bepaalt de hele context.

AG: Ik probeer dat. Dat is wat ik volgens mij kan doen als coach binnen het maken van televisie. En ook van nou, die zit voor je, die gaat echt iedereen wegvagen. Daar kom je niet overheen. Ga daar ook maar niet zitten. Ga maar gewoon heel rustig in je eigen en heel rustig je ding doen. En dan zie je dat dat dan, dat de rest van de juryleden dan zegt: “Wat ik zo mooi vond”, snap je? Dus je moet gewoon proberen een stap vooruit te denken.

BP: Strategisch eigenlijk.
AG: Heel… Ik ben enorm van de strategie. Afgelopen maandag is de geluidsman begraven, die was plotseling dood waarmee ik vroeger toen hij jong was al werkte bij de Dolly Dots, Fred van Venetië. En die deed heel vaak de mixing in de zaal. En dan zei ik heel vaak: “Fred, in de commercial break krijg je van mij nog een laatste briefje.” En dan zag ik hoe de stemming was bij mijn mede-jury en dan dacht ik: “OK, die zegt dat, OK, briefje, ging naar Fred toe, Jaap tweede bij…” En dan wist hij het.

BP: Zo ver gaat dat! Wow.

AG: Zo ver gaat dat. Hier.

BP: Dus jij wil ook zelf heel graag winnen?

AG: Absoluut. En dan ook een: “Doe die en die, minder galm, laat maar droger klinken. Want de rest zit zo… wij gaan hem van de andere kant….”

BP: Ongelofelijk. Ik vind dit wel heel leuk om te weten.

AG: Ik zeg het ook altijd tegen mijn vrienden in de wagen, want in de wagen hoor je iets anders, dat weten we. Dat klinkt in de zaal, heb je de boventonen erbij, je hebt het enthousiasme van het publiek, je hebt de performance en dan hoor je het in de wagen en dan klinkt het echt als een drol. Ja, dat weten we.

BP: Kurkdroog.

AG: In de wagen zeg ik ook nog: “OK, in het geval van het koortje nog ietsje harder, kan je daar het koortje iets inschuiven? Deze uithaal, kan je daar een beetje galm bij doen?”

BP: Echt een engineer, een sound engineer bijna.

AG: En dan krijgt hij een tekst, dan kan hij dat gewoon volgen. Het lukt niet altijd.

BP: Maar je maakt er wel werk van?

AG: Ik maak daar echt… Echt, dat is net die laatste tien procent die je dan nog extra doet.

BP: Wow. Ja. En je wint…

AG: Nou geef ik wel al mijn geheimen weg.

BP: Maar ze doen het je toch niet snel na.
AG: Ik deed het wel als enige. En later ook Marco natuurlijk samen met Ton, Ton is een oude schoolkameraad van mij en een heel goeie vriend ook van Nico, de beste drummer van Nederland. En die deed het ook wel, ja.

BP: OK. Hoe onderscheid je voor je kandidaten diverse leerdoelen buiten de wedstrijd om? Dus straks is die wedstrijd voorbij en je weet, je moet die mensen het veld in gaan sturen. Dus wat geef je ze mee om aan te werken of aan te studeren?

AG: Het ene kind, als het gaat om kinderen, sommige kinderen hadden al musicals gedaan, in één geval van een zeer groot talent, Jurre Otto, die deed al musicals en dan weer acteren dit. En toen was hij vijftien en toen hebben Babette en ik alle twee wel veel gesproken, Babette Labeij en ik met die moeder en die vader van: “Laat hem effe ook gewoon vijftien zijn. Hij is zo’n talent, weet je wel, laat hem ook, laat hem niet altijd in een plan van een ander zitten.”
Bij een musical zit je in een plan van een ander. Toen heb ik de Dutch School of Popular Music aangeboden, daar is hij heen, en hij werd uitgenodigd voor het conservatorium. Hij is erg pril nog, maar hij zit nog steeds in de race.
Dus die, ik hoop dat hij aangenomen wordt en anders wordt het volgend jaar. Dus dan zie je dat iemand die toch, een jong kind in de kindermusicals, toch nu uiteindelijk hier terecht komt. Want…

BP: Er is nog te leren?

AG: Ja, er is te leren. Ik zeg tegen heel veel kinderen: “Ga op zangles.” Ik zeg tegen mensen: “Je moet op zangles”, of “Waarom leer je niet een instrument bespelen?”

BP: Verbreding ook.

AG: Sommige kinderen zeg ik: “Ga heel veel, ga met die vriend van jou met die gitaar… Ga overal optreden. Kilometers maken, maak maar kilometers.” Want weet je Blanka, als je niet zelf kunt zorgen voor je eigen omveld, je eigen werk, dan ga je het niet redden in het vak. Je moet het zelf doen, daar kan geen Voice-winner… Ik ken Voice winnaars die gewonnen hebben en helemaal naar de klote zijn gegaan. Omdat je het zelf moet doen.

BP: Hanteer je een ander beoordelend systeem binnen het coachen dan als jurylid van een muziekwedstrijd? En zo ja, welk verschil is dat?

AG: Bij Holland’s Got Talent hoef ik niet te coachen. Maar dit jaar hadden we een jong joch van zeventien die volgens mij zomaar een hele grote volkszanger zou kunnen worden. Nou, dat was best uniek. Echt, heeft alles. Maar hij had ook alle – dat zei Chantal heel terecht – alle trucjes al van Jeroen van den Boom en weet je, dat wegtrekken en dat… En lelijk fraseren. Dus ik heb gezegd: “Ja, maar het zou ook wel zomaar de nieuwe volkszanger kunnen zijn, dus we moeten hier een zangcoach op zetten.” Daar zit een geweldige zangcoach, ik ben even zijn naam vergeten, en die jongen maakt een enorme sprong.
BP: Was er een verschil in het gehanteerde beoordelend systeem binnen je eigen opleiding en die van de muziekwedstrijden?

AG: Ik heb, mijn opleiding, mijn muziekopleiding die ik heb gehad, ik was tot mijn achtentwintigste Dolly Dot. In die tijd begon net de lichte muziek in Rotterdam. Amsterdam had het nog niet eens, jazz alleen. En ik ben toen naar de open dag in Rotterdam geweest, en toen kwam ik daar de directeur tegen, die zegt: “O, ik wilde je bellen of je eens een keer een masterclass wil geven.” Ik zeg: “Ik kom hier om te kijken of ik hier kan leren.” Hij zegt: “Wij kunnen je niets meer leren.” En toen heb ik mijn… ik had sowieso al twee keer per week zangles, ik had twee keer per week pianoles, en ik studeerde solfège, dus de muziektheorie bij mevrouw Weiner, dat was ook drie keer per week. Dus ik was fulltime ermee bezig, het kostte me zevenhonderd (700) gulden per maand.
Dus daar moest ik hard voor werken om dat te kunnen betalen.

BP: Een flinke investering.

AG: Ik heb dat ongeveer drie jaar gedaan, vier jaar gedaan. En in de week van mijn staatsexamen, dat ik staatsexamen moest doen, stond ik vijf keer in DeLaMar met Purper, had ik de release van mijn album die binnenkwam op negentien en de eerste opname van de Uitdaging, het eerste televisieprogramma wat ik deed.
Dat was in die week.

BP: Het komt allemaal samen, lijkt het altijd weer.

AG: Altijd. En toen heb ik nooit het staatsexamen gedaan en nu kan dat niet meer, nu is dat er niet meer. Dus ik heb geen papieren.

BP: Maar je hebt wel die zelfstudie dus eigenlijk georganiseerd.
AG: Ja. Maar ik speel nog steeds als een kramp piano, en ik lees nog steeds als een kleuter.

BP: Vind je dat jammer?

AG: Ja, ik vind het wel jammer. Want ik heb uiteindelijk nu met die Muzikale Komedie voor het eerst weer muziekliedjes ingestudeerd. Ik moest wel, die partijen waren zo lastig. En toen dacht ik: “O”, en toen kwam het langzaam weer terug. Maar ik heb het eigenlijk al die jaren niet hoeven gebruiken. En ik kan echt mooie liedjes maken, ik componeer echt heel mooi en dat kan ook als je gewoon eenvoudige akkoorden kunt spelen.

BP: Ja. Maar vooral wat je laat zien: je ging er zelf achteraan en je organiseerde het ook weer binnen de mogelijkheden van dat moment voor jezelf, dat vind ik heel mooi om te horen.

AG: Ja, goeie leraren gehad ook, ja.

BP: Wat doe je als coach voor je kandidaten als je het niet eens bent met de rest van de jury?

AG: Ruzie maken. Bij de X-Factor stonden we bekend, dat we elkaar echt gewoon…dat we enorme ruzie kregen. Gewoon off stage maar gewoon ook op de televisie. Eric van Tijn en Gordon, wij hebben wel… Ja, je wordt, je bent zo betrokken bij je kandidaten. Dat vond het publiek natuurlijk wel weer heel leuk. Maar dat je echt heel kwaad was op elkaar. Ja, en dan later lachen we dat weer weg. Maar ik ben wel razend, ik ben zo gekwetst geweest. Maar ja, ze hadden uiteindelijk wel gelijk.
BP: Maar waar, wat kwetst je dan als ik vragen mag?

AG: Nou, dat ze opeens dan, dat ze opeens kozen…. dat Eric zei van: “Ik ga dan toch voor de jeugd” en dat mijn fantastische kandidate werd weggestuurd.
Terwijl ze zo goed was. Maar wat ik me even niet realiseerde toen, is dat het publiek haar natuurlijk al heel weinig stemmen had gegeven.
En later, jaren later kwam Ali B bij ons bij de X Factor en die zag ook zijn beste zangeres gaan. Die was zo kwaad op ons, en toen zei ik: “Ja schat, ik weet waar je vandaan komt, maar ze heeft gewoon geen stemmen gekregen want je hebt haar niet goed neergezet. Het is jouw schuld.” Ja, ja, ja. We leren ervan, we proberen het allemaal goed te doen.

BP: Ja. Wat doe je als coach voor je kandidaat als jij het wel eens bent met een jury maar je kandidaat niet? Hoe van je dat dan op? Wat zeg je dan tegen die kandidaat?

AG: Nou ja, kijk, sommige mensen hebben ook wel oogkleppen. Of sommige jonge mensen… Die hebben dan… Die zijn zo overtuigd van hun eigen kunnen en die kunnen eigenlijk helemaal niet tegen kritiek. En dan zeg ik: “Ja, maar dit is gezegd, deal with it. Je kunt het niet meer terugdraaien, dit is wat het is. Ga je er wat mee doen ja of nee, dat is aan jou. Maar hij of zij had wel een punt, dat snap ik wel. Daar moeten we de volgende keer laten zien dat we dat, we moeten de volgende keer iedereen laten zien dat we het gehoord hebben.”
En ja, dat zeg ik, er zijn mensen die nemen dingen aan en er zijn mensen die nemen dingen niet aan.

BP: Dat is op school ook zo.
AG: Ik heb nog steeds…iemand die is nog steeds boos… maar die staat nog steeds…slecht te timen bij allerlei bands. Weet je wel? Die… Die vond het belachelijk dat ik hem niet meenam naar de liveshows. Ja, het was niet goed. Ja, jammer.
BP: Ja. Dan last but not least, ik doe een aantal uitspraken en jij mag antwoorden met eens, een beetje eens, een beetje oneens of oneens. Je mag het heel kort houden, maar stel dat je behoefte voelt om…

AG: Iets te zeggen, dan zeg ik het.
BP: De eerste: De maatschappij waardeert wedstrijden als een canonvorming, als een meting van de echte waarde.

AG: Niet mee eens.

BP: De kracht van wedstrijden ligt in de stimulans van studenten om hun best te doen.

AG: Ja, eens.

BP: Een hoge score ontvangen voelt goed voor de bandleden en werkt daardoor stimulerend.

AG: Mee eens.

BP: Wedstrijden zorgen dat het niveau stijgt.

AG: Mee eens.

BP: Wedstrijden zorgen voor een grotere belangstelling voor muziek.

AG: Absoluut mee eens. Het is de enige manier nog waarop we muziek tegenwoordig op televisie hebben. Ja.

BP: Het idee van een muziekwedstrijd slaat zo aan, want het brengt het natuurlijke instinct van rivaliteit en verovering naar boven.

AG: Ik denk wel dat dat werkt bij het publiek, eens. Ja.

BP: Wedstrijden kunnen een educatief proces, en daardoor de ontwikkeling, belemmeren.

AG: Ook. Daar ben ik het ook mee eens, dat ligt per persoon en per wedstrijd. Je moet heel goed bedenken aan welke wedstrijd je meedoet, of je wat, of je wat te winnen hebt.

BP: En geef eens een paar doelen die je vindt dat je ermee zou kunnen winnen?

AG: Sommige mensen doen mee aan de Grote Prijs van Nederland, dat is een ervaring en dat is leuk en dat kan je als bandje, dat is leuk. Maar niet iedereen is geschikt om mee te doen met The Voice. Ik raad het vaker af dan aan.

BP: De zwakte van wedstrijden is dat men zich sec gaat inspannen alleen om te winnen.

AG: Eens.

BP: In een wedstrijd wordt winnen een belangrijker doel dan ontwikkelen en leren.

AG: Eens, helaas. Maar ik niet hoor, ik blijf hameren op dat andere.

Probeer er ook wat van te leren, en het is ook zo want het is een snelkookpan, zo’n wedstrijd. Ze leren zoveel, dat leer je… Anderen doen daar tien, twintig jaar over. Dus…

BP: Wedstrijden maken het verschil tussen een atletiekveld en klaslokaal diffuus.

AG: Maar bij sport heb je maar één (1) winnaar, en bij muziek is het uiteindelijk toch… Daar hoef je niet te winnen, maar je hebt wel je ding kunnen laten zien. Het is toch echt iets anders.

BP: OK. Wedstrijd, het woord zegt het al, doet strijd en jaloezie ontstaan en voedt deze.

AG: Zou kunnen, ja.

BP: Een beetje eens of helemaal eens?

AG: Een beetje eens.

BP: Wedstrijden zorgen dat de aandacht meer gefocust is op externe factoren zoals de rivalen of de jury dan op de performance zelf.

AG: Beetje mee eens. Dat ligt, dat zit een beetje in het middengebied. Soms niet, soms wel. Een beetje mee eens. Ook een beetje mee oneens, het zit in het midden. Neutraal.

BP: In het volwassen leven is er al genoeg competitie, rivaliteit en verhit geworstel. De jeugd hoeft niet tijdens een ontwikkeling hier al meteen aan mee te doen.

AG: Nee, maar het is ook niet voor iedereen. Mee eens dus, het is niet voor iedereen.

BP: In het dagelijks leven is er al genoeg competitie, rivaliteit en verhit geworstel. Het kunstklaslokaal zou juist een vrijplaats moeten bieden.

AG: Helemaal mee eens.
BP: O, wat mooi. Het kunstklaslokaal zou een plek moeten zijn waar iedereen op zijn eigen kwaliteiten gewaardeerd wordt.

AG: Helemaal mee eens.

BP: Zich vergelijken met anderen komt de ontwikkeling van de eigen autonomie niet ten goede.

AG: Mee eens. Ik zeg altijd: “Als je vergelijkt met elkaar, dan kan je ijdel worden of onzeker of bitter. Dus doe maar niet. Kijk maar wat je zelf te brengen hebt, dat is mooi genoeg.”

BP: OK. In kunsteducatie is het ontwikkelen van autonomie een belangrijk hoofddoel.

AG: Helemaal mee eens.

BP: Studenten die niet succesvol zijn in een wedstrijd zijn niet voorbereid om de consequenties van verliezer goed te verwerken.

AG: Nou, daar ben ik het niet mee eens toch, nee.

BP: OK. Alle aandacht gaat uit naar de winnaars ten koste van de zorg om de verliezers.

AG: Daar ben ik het ook niet mee eens, nee. Tenminste niet hoe ik het meemaak.

BP: Natuurlijk, we vragen ook naar jouw ervaring. We hoorden ook net hoeveel zorg je eigenlijk om de verliezers genereert.

AG: Ja.

BP: Het denken in winners and loosers zal geen plaats moeten hebben binnen kunsteducatie.

AG: Mee eens.

BP: Kunst zou ‘the antidote’ moeten zijn van de winners and losers mentaliteit.

AG: Mee eens.

BP: Aan wedstrijden meedoen is belangrijk omdat je zo ook leert een goed burger te zijn terwijl je je motivatie verhoogt en je public relations verbetert.

AG: Eens.

BP: Een persoon die erg competitief ingesteld is tegen andere teams, de inter-groep rivaliteit, wordt dat even zo makkelijk tegen zijn eigen team of bandleden, intra-groep rivaliteit.

AG: Helemaal mee eens. Je hebt altijd van die mensen die hebben enorme ellenbogen en die weten zich overal in te likken. Maar uiteindelijk wordt het wel door, ziet… Je ziet het. En weet je wat, één (1) ding bijvoorbeeld op televisie, televisie is meedogenloos. Je krijgt echt, je hebt… Je komt er niet mee weg. Mensen gaan dat zien. Dus dat kan soms voor in je voordeel werken, maar heel vaak vinden mensen, knappen dan ook af.

BP: Duidelijk. Wedstrijden hebben educationele voordelen. Eén (1) studenten werken harder, het niveau van de performance wordt hoger, het is ook goed sociaal onderwijs.

AG: Mee eens, ja.

BP: OK. Dus je ziet daar wel een plek voor. Wedstrijden hebben educationele nadelen. Eén (1) de stress die wedstrijden met zich meebrengen zorgen ervoor dat bepaalde getalenteerde studenten afhaken, negatieve ervaringen kunnen tot onhaalbaar perfectionisme leiden, en perfectionisme kan burn-outs en drop-outs tot gevolg hebben.

AG: Ja, daar ben ik het wel een beetje mee eens ja.

BP: Als er geen competitief element is, dan verlaagt the standard van een performance.

AG:
Dat weet ik niet.

BP: Oneens?

AG: Oneens ja, dat weet ik niet. Ik weet het niet, ik denk het niet nee. Want je wil toch altijd, we zijn toch allemaal wel begonnen vanuit een drijfveer, dus je wil het toch zo goed mogelijk doen.

BP: Met of zonder wedstrijd, ja. Wedstrijdelementen zorgen juist voor virtuoos resultaat.

AG: Niet helemaal mee eens. Ik bedoel, ik word bijvoorbeeld slechter van een wedstrijd.
Snap je? Ik krijg dan gewoon iets dwarsigs. Ik word, ik heb, ik ben er niet geschikt voor.
BP: Duidelijk. Wedstrijden vergelijken studenten tot onvergelijkbare kwaliteiten.

AG: Mee eens.

BP: Het jureren van kunstmuziekwedstrijden is het vergelijken van appels en peren.

AG: Helemaal mee eens.
BP: Meedoen aan wedstrijden heeft de volgende voordelen: Het leidt tot gebruik betere muziek, verbetering van het instrumentarium, dat kan ook de stem zijn natuurlijk, verhoogde belangstelling voor schoolmuziek van ouders en studenten, goede beoordelingen of belangrijk jurycommentaar, vergroot sociaal aspect, men luistert meer of beter naar andere groepen.

AG: Ja, ik denk dat ik het daarmee eens ben, ja.

BP: Meedoen aan wedstrijden heeft de volgende negatieve effecten: Over-benadrukking van het competitieve aspect, teveel tijd gespendeerd aan de wedstrijdstukken, slechte beoordeling of negatief jurycommentaar wat dwarszit, vijandelijkheden tegen andere goede performances van een wedstrijd.

AG: Ik heb dat nooit zo heel extreem meegemaakt.

BP: Eigenlijk oneens dan?

AG: Het zijn, wat zei je het laatste nou? De vijandelijkheden?
BP: Ja, tegen de andere competitors, performers.

AG: Kan je hem nog eens een keer opnoemen?

 

BP: Eén, teveel tijd gespendeerd aan wedstrijdstukken.

AG: Ja.
BP: Over-benadrukking van het competitieve aspect, het willen winnen. Slechte beoordeling of dus negativiteit van een jurycommentaar en vijandelijkheid tegen andere goede performance.

AG: Dat zijn eigenlijk verschillende dingen.

BP: Ja. Het is een collectief statement, opsomming. Komt ook uit de studie hoor, deze vragen.
AG: Nou, ik neig naar niet helemaal mee eens, ja.

BP: Duidelijk, heel goed. De afsluiting: Ik zou graag je advies willen horen voor onze studenten of sowieso alle studenten die luisteren die niet weten of ze wel of niet mee moeten doen aan een wedstrijd. Dus studenten die daar in dubio zitten, heb je daar een advies voor?

AG: Een voorbeeld: Ik zit dus nu in die Muzikale Komedie met allemaal acteurs, of actrices en één acteur. Ze kunnen allemaal heel goed zingen, ze hebben goed onderwijs op de Kleinkunstacademie gehad en kunnen ook allemaal lezen. En we doen hele ingewikkelde koorliedjes. Dus Purple Rain maar dan als een koor. En het is een losgeslagen rock ’n roll koor. Maar er is ook een programma dat heet It Takes Two, dat zijn bekende Nederlanders die dan niet perse zanger zijn, die dan met Waylon, Trijntje of Glennis Grace duetten zingen. En ik zit dan toevallig in de jury en wij zoeken natuurlijk weer nieuwe kandidaten daarvoor. Al die acteurs bij mij die allemaal heel goed zijn: “Zou je dat willen doen?” “O nee, dat durf ik niet.”

BP: Echt waar?

AG: “Dat durf ik echt niet. Nu kan ik me verschuilen in mijn rol en dan moet ik opeens iemand zijn die dan denkt dat hij kan zingen.” Dus dat was heel interessant om te zien.

BP: Heel interessant.

AG: Hoeveel geld dat ook eventueel oplevert voor ze en ze het allemaal wel kunnen gebruiken, deden ze dat dus niet. Ja, ik zou gewoon voor jezelf kijken. Is het een wedstrijd, wil ik daarbij horen? Is dit mijn bloedgroep?

BP: Right.

AG: Is dit, wil ik meedoen aan de Popprijs of aan de Grote Prijs van Nederland? Of vind ik eigenlijk The Voice wel spannend? Dus wil ik met grote halen naar het grote publiek, of wil ik met kleine stappen misschien het publiek van de toekomst bereiken? Of wil ik met de beste singer-songwriter in mijn eentje dat publiek bereiken? Je moet kijken, heb ik daar wat te halen? Is er wat voor mij?

Dat zeggen ze ook altijd over die contracten, die contracten zijn zo erg. Nou, het valt allemaal wel mee, want op het moment dat je niet meer meedoet, wordt hij heel vaak ontbonden. De winnaar, als je niet oplet, ja dan ben je wel een tijdje voor minder geld aan het werk, maar wel heel vaak aan het werk. Nou goed, dat. Maar dan denk ik altijd ja, kijk nou… Ze zeggen altijd dat die programma’s die willen, die zuigen je leeg. Maar je moet het andersom draaien, je moet kijken is dit een podium voor mij? Kan ik hier laten zien wat ik wil laten zien?
Voor mij persoonlijk had het als kind, kon ik dat niet.
Ik was een heel blij, grappig kind dat echt heel goed kon zingen, maar het feit dat ik dan mee moest doen aan een wedstrijd, dan verlamde ik helemaal. Dus ik heb dat, voor mij is het niet geschikt.
Dus ik zeg altijd maar: “Kijk maar of het voor jou wat is.”

BP: Een hele strategische insteek. Wat is je advies aan docenten en coaches zoals ikzelf die studenten begeleiden tijdens een wedstrijd? Wat zou je ons mee willen geven?

AG: Alleen maar wat je al doet Blanka. Gewoon wie ben jij in de kern? Dus het talent, wat is jouw unieke…? Nou, als we het even in marketing… What is your unique selling point?

Iedereen heeft iets wat een ander niet heeft, want we zijn nou eenmaal allemaal anders. Waarin kan je dat versterken? Waarom was Lou Reed een geweldige muzikant, terwijl hij eigenlijk niet kan zingen? En ook nog eens chagrijnig.
Maar waarom was hij zo geweldig? Of waarom is Bob Dylan zo geweldig? Hij kan niet zingen die man, hij heeft een verschrikkelijke stem.
Kijk, dus dat zijn allemaal voorbeelden. Waarom is Adele, dat is zo’n fantastische zangeres die toch wel dat hoog en dat laag heeft, maar ook eentje die niet bang is om af en toe eens een toontje net weg te glijden. Die is er helemaal niet bang voor. En zij is gaan, zij zit op de kern wie ze is. Dus kijk gewoon wat heb jij unieks te bieden en ga daarop zitten, ga dat maar etaleren. Dat als jij heel goed een vertellend liedje kan zingen, ga dan niet Sia zingen maar zing een vertellend liedje.

En blijf weg van mooizingerij of kijk eens wat ik kan. Nee gewoon, dit is wat ik jou te bieden heb. Laat een stuk van je ziel zien. Nou, dat is wat jij al doet met mensen, wat gebeurt er met je? Ik zou altijd daarop zitten en als ze al iets hebben ingestudeerd en ze willen iets en ze laten dat zien en het is soms niet helemaal perfect maar er gebeurt wel wat.
Dat moet je ook durven niets te doen met ze.

BP: Er vanaf blijven. Ja, dat is ook een kunst inderdaad.
AG: Er vanaf blijven.
Dat doe ik wel eens. Dan zeg ik: “Ja, ja.”
Ik zeg: “Ja, ik hoor wel dat en dat, maar als je daarop gaat zitten, dan verlies je dat. En ik vind dat eigenlijk… Daarmee kan je jezelf onderscheiden.”
En daarom zijn vaak degenen die niet The Voice of de X Factor winnen, dat zijn vaak de mensen die het wel redden in het vak.

BP: Ja, heel goed. Angela, echt super bedankt dat je in je gigantische drukte hier nog tijd voor hebt vrijgemaakt.

AG: Ik vind dit belangrijk. Dit soort dingen vind ik belangrijk.

BP: Fijn. Ik natuurlijk ook, anders was ik het onderzoek niet begonnen. En ik hoop dat alle luisteraars hier hun voordeel mee kunnen doen en ook ja, net als ik hebben genoten van dit gesprek. Dankjewel.

AG: Dankjewel.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Music Competition, it’s not the only way. Interview with Paul Medeiros.

Podcast interview with Paul Medeiros (click here)

Transcript of interview with Paul Medeiros.

Paul Medeiros: bachelor and master classical music, violin.

Blanka Pesja: senior art educator, researcher master art education.

Blanka: Today’s episode is in English. I’ll be questioning Canadian born Dutch resident Paul Medeiros, I should say Paul, on the ins and outs, the pros and cons of competition in music education. Paul completed his bachelor of music and performance at Dalhousie University in Halifax Canada under the tutelage of professor Phillip Jockets. He won on two occasions the Dalhousie Concerto Night competition. He is notably the recipient of the 2006 Ramon Hnatyshyn competition.

Paul: Ramon Hnatyshyn foundation. The Ramon Hnatyshyn foundation is like a Holland Distinction that was started a number of years back in Ottawa. It’s a national competition and every year they choose per category of arts, one young artist entering the bachelor program. Someone that has exemplary talent that shows a lot of promise for the future. They look for such people and they screen for these young artists through the use of recordings. It’s not live performance. Its recorded performance, still live unedited performance but that is sent then into the competition. They choose someone that has, I guess you could say the most unique voice or the one that shows the most promise to have a successful career.

Blanka: You won that?

 Paul: Yes, for the orchestral instruments. Everything that you would find in an orchestra, all the different instruments that’s all put into one competition category. They also have one for solo piano, they have ones for ballet, jazz, et cetera.

Blanka: Paul completed his master’s in music in 2012 with an in-depth study of the Franco-Belgian violin tradition of the 19th century. During his degree he studied with professor Cornelius Koelmans, and Lex Korff de Gidts at The Conservatory of Amsterdam. Paul, could I conclude from your successful participation in competition, that you would advocate music competitions?

 

Paul: No, it depends on who I’m speaking to, because this is the point of my opinion on competitions. There is a time and a place and they are very valuable but they are not the pinnacles of arts for me.

 

Blanka: Have you noticed with yourself that you have changed your opinion? You were maybe first pro, then against, then pro, again or have you been stable in your opinion.

 

Paul: To be quite honest I was pro when I was winning and I was con when I was not winning.

 

Blanka: That came up in the previous guest talks.

 

Paul: Yes, but I have to say that honestly they are really valuable for certain goal. You should always have a goal in mind when you do a competition. You shouldn’t just do it for the sake of doing a competition or because people, especially if people just expect you to do competitions, you shouldn’t do it for that reason. You should have a vested interest and a specific goal in mind when you do such things.

 

Blanka: Can you give me an example of such goals?

 

Paul: The first one that comes to mind for a solo competition or even with a quartet chamber music, is for technical prowess. You want to prepare yourself in the most technically secure and brilliant way possible, because that is what they look for in competitions today. They look for technically pristine playing and music unfortunately in my experience whether, depends on the competition that you do but the majority solo competitions in the world, they are looking for technical prowess above artistic originality.
That’s also reflected in the way conservatories, the best conservatories in any case, the way they train their pupils to really focus on technical precision and style. These two things, the tradition … That’s why a lot of conservatories are seen as maybe factories, for lack of a better word. Their goal is to train you so that you can do anything technically when you come out. Of course, if you are a musician, that will always come out in the end. That will always come out, especially if you are honest with yourself that will always come out. Competitions, they function in a similar way to conservatories I would say.

 

Blanka: There is an extension there? Like you are trained to be technically the best you can be and then from that, the natural goal would be to enter a competition to show off the technical prowess?

 

Paul: Sure, or to refine it beyond what, I guess you could say what your environment that you are sitting in allows. If you put yourself in a competition, especially an international one, then you are competing on a much higher level than a local competition. If you want to build up, of course you start with local competitions and then you work your way up depending on how you do in the local competitions.

 

Blanka: I heard a teacher say, the bigger the character or personality, the less chance that they will win a competition, would you agree with that? If you have a big personality or you have a lot of own opinions, then maybe you are more original or your interpretation is outside the box, so to speak. Winning a contest will then not really be an option?

 

Paul: I wouldn’t exclude it entirely but I definitely agree with that statement that it is much more difficult as a unique individual, as someone that thinks outside the box to win a competition. The thing is, competitions, they have a very narrow set of qualities that they are looking for on a very high level.

 

Blanka: Are you aware of what they ask of you, each and different competition?

 

Paul: Not always.

 

Blanka: Do you have a general idea of what is expected or can you sort of train yourself to win a specific competition knowing what they will look for?

 

Paul: That’s a complicated question as well because you could have people in the jury that know you. I have a few stories in my past of it, both from an advantage standpoint and from a disadvantage standpoint where people that were competing against me, they had more connections in the jury than I did. Of course, if you have connections, you have relationship with that professional, they know you are playing, especially if they like your playing, you are in good standing because they are going to naturally gravitate towards the qualities that that person has.
Of course that’s not entirely the case all the time with competitions, good competitions, they tend to be much more the ones that are very proper in the way that they function and that there is not a whole lot of politics going on but of course everybody knows that doesn’t exist exclusively.

 

Blanka: For my research Paul, I would like to present to you a set of question, the previous guests had to answer and I will compare your answers for my research. Feel free to elaborate. To start with two general questions. What are the positive and negative effects of competition in music education?

 

Paul: Positives would be that it definitely gives the teacher, such as myself, I would say a view, to push the student forth. The student decides to do a competition. The teacher can get much more intense with teaching the technique, with expecting a higher standard because they have a now said reason beyond their own desires for their student.

 

Blanka: Very clear, and negative effect?

 

Paul: It does put a certain amount of unnatural pressure on the student to develop in a sort of systematic way or I suppose a more robotic way, technical way that sometimes goes against the natural development of a student’s technique and musical ability.

 

Blanka: In your educational experience, which students or actually as being a student yourself for a long time, I imagine, which students can benefit from competition and music education, and which students may suffer from competition and music education?

 

Paul: That’s a really good question. I think the students that benefit the most from competitions are the ones that are naturally, their make-up is naturally geared towards competitions. I don’t think competitions are for everyone because I don’t think that everyone thinks in the way that a competition would want their candidates to think.

 

Blanka: Give me a really concrete example of someone who is made to compete, in your opinion as a violinist.

 

Paul: Somebody who is very, we say in Dutch Pietje Precies. Someone is very precise technically speaking, very stable, very technically stable and goes for a very clean performance all the time. Someone who is not overly emotional I would say or expressive extrovertly. That’s what I’ve often seen as it, people that tend to be very much inner-reflective people that are very, set an extremely high standard for themselves. Those kinds of people I would say.

 

Blanka: People who suffer, how would you characterize them?

 

Paul: I would think people such as myself.

 

Blanka: The overly emotional, can I say that?

 

Paul: Overly emotional. I think I’ve become much more imbalanced in that way over the years.

 

Blanka: Let me reframe that: emotional expressive.

 

Paul: Yes, that would be. Somebody who wants to take risks I would say. Above all, its people that get on stage, we say in Dutch, podium based. They are a stage best. They get up there and they want to, not only make beautiful music and really play the music but they want to really connect with their audience on an emotional level. That’s another level than somebody who’s, for lack of a better word, a cold playing technical player who can really play.

 

Blanka: The focus is somewhere else?

 

Paul: Yeah.

 

Blanka: That you can hear in the performance?

 

Paul: Yeah, and if you don’t mind, I would like to add that competition, of course we are talking about competitions as they are today. If you look back sixty years, seventy years ago, to the … I would say the golden period of individual artists…

 

Blanka: Really, you think that?

 

Paul: I think perhaps it’s a bit conservative of me to think this but I think a lot of people, a lot of my colleagues and superiors would agree that in the time of the early 20th century we had the likes of Jacques Thibaud and Fritz Kreisler, we had Jascha Heifets, Mischa Elman, who his technique was so unique, so against the grain. The guy played, he had super long fingernails and he played with flat fingers on the fingerboard. That is, first of all, if I see any of my students coming to the lessons with long fingernails, I almost send them away. “Go cut your nails,” because it’s impossible to tune.

He found this unique way of playing and it affected the sound in a very unique way. These kinds of individual artists that had this really intimate connection with the violin, as if it’s their own body. Somehow that has changed in the course of sixty, seventy years. I think it largely has to do with recording technology.

 

Blanka: Explain.

 

Paul: Where we put so much onto the microscope now with the precise recording technology that we have. It’s unbelievable what we can do, that everybody is in a competition with everyone. Whether you are in a competition or just recording an album to create the most technically perfect sounding album. The music comes through but it takes a backseat to the technical brilliance, because when people listen to recordings, if they hear one out of tune note they immediately write it off as less than worthy of their money, but also less than worthy of listening to it more than once. The standard is just incredibly high.

 

Blanka: You think that it also changed then the way listeners perceive music through this technology precision?

 

Paul: Absolutely, because we are not used to listening to the old greats anymore that played out of tune quite often, and that were sometimes a bit sloppy with their technique but always brought the message across, so convincingly that you always would think after such a performance, “This is the only way.” That’s just so amazing. Now we listen to people on stage with a magnifying glass. With already zooming in on, “What’s that note?” It’s a real shame. Art is becoming a science and sports. We are losing the individuality because people just don’t want to take the risks anymore to think.

 

Blanka: Do you think that art is hijacked by science or by a sport mentality or do you think it still has its own quarter somewhere?

 

Paul: It certainly still has its own quarter but …

 

Blanka: Not in the eye of major public?

 

Paul: I think because technology has taken an increasingly dominant role in society, that the humanity is somehow compromised in arts. It’s becoming, if you look at the popular music of today, it’s all electronic, which is … on a side note, I improvise with the DJ, I don’t …

 

Blanka: You are not against electronic?

 

Paul: Yeah.

 

Blanka: I guess you also agree that with electronic music, we can connect meaningful with an audience?

 

Paul: Yes, we can, but it’s in the sincerity of how you present it. Music, it still has to be human. It still has to be something, I believe a perfect balance between cerebral and heartfelt playing.

 

Blanka: A personal question, what is your personal view on competition in music education? Actually we have covered that unless you really want to elaborate more.

 

Paul: There is a type of person that succeeds much better in the end, others that will learn a great deal of technique but won’t win.

 

Blanka: Can I say that for you as a private person, you don’t feel too comfortable with what is expected from you during competition and you are more on the scale of the emotional expressive player?

 

Paul: Yeah, I would say that’s who I am. I often tend to work well with people that are actually my polar opposites.

 

Blanka: I like that.

 

Paul: In my flute quartets, I have a wonderful colleague Katya Woloshyn and she is about as opposite as me as it can get in terms of personality. We’ve been playing chamber music together for about five years. I really can rely on her. She is a really stable, really good player. We often don’t see eye to eye but we find the middle ground, which tends to work the best. We challenge each other.

 

Blanka: That’s wonderful. I always like that in creative teams. What is your personal positive and negative experiences with competition in music education, what did you experience that really put you off or that excited you?

 

Paul: The first one was, when I was in Canada, I did the Canadian music competition. Before that we had smaller competitions called Kiwanis and other conservatory competitions that I did rather well with but they were, some of which I’ve won but they were often very local, most of the people competing were from the same teacher or from maybe two teachers. That’s not really competition.
When I did the Canadian music competition, the competition structure at least when I was there was: you start with regionals, as with any sport, you start with the regional round and then you go to a national level after that. At regional level, it was mostly from the same teacher but there were a few players that came to the competition that weren’t even from our region. They rigged the system because it was easier for them to get to nationals in our area than if they were to compete in a big city like Montreal or Toronto.

 

Blanka: Politics indeed.

 

Paul: They would come; they would say that they were ‘studying’ with my teacher or with a teacher in that area. They would do this and that’s how they would fill up the forms and that’s because they had maybe one lesson, this is how they played. Then they stayed in a hotel and they played at the competition. Because they come from a much larger city or from another area where the standard is different or so forth, or they just know competitions better, they win. There was a big, it was a bit of a scandal. I was up against this one girl who came from Chicago, she wasn’t even from Canada, but she studied, and she managed to, through some kind of family thing she managed to get herself as a Canadian on the form.

 

Blanka: To what length do people go?

 

Paul: It’s unbelievable, and her playing, I don’t want to damage someone, that’s why I’m not using any names but her playing, I’m a violinist and she’s a violinist, she sounded a bit like a mosquito when she played.

 

Blanka: The sound wasn’t what you really liked?

 

Paul: No, the sound was just really irritating to listen to but technically she was brilliant. Sound-wise and musically you wouldn’t want to listen to it again but technically she was up there. She got through. I didn’t go on to the next round and I had really …

 

Blanka: I count this on the negative experience.

 

Paul: Yes, it was a negative. It really turned me off. It also turned me off because of the reactions of my colleagues and superiors. They were all very upset with how it went because it was political and it was a nasty move, it’s not fair.

 

Blanka: I think the Hollywood movies are made from these stories.

 

Paul: I don’t live in North America for a reason but I do love my Canada and I come back there whenever I can to visit family and friends.

 

Blanka: You wouldn’t say this is a Canadian thing or it really happens all over the place?

 

Paul: No, it’s a competitive thing.

 

Blanka: What sort of adjustments would you like to implement if you had a say in it? evidently there are a few things that you have thought of, “If I had a say, this would change.”

 

Paul: I’d like to see a jury that’s much more balanced. A jury that focuses 50% on the technique and 50% on the music. Of course the technique and the music, they are bound to each other, because without good technique you can’t be musical. However, I think that a few out of tune notes or a note that didn’t speak perfectly at one point, that that is of less importance than the overall musical statement that you are making. I want to see a jury that can think with their heads and their hearts at the same time.

 

Blanka: As a practicing musician, here are some personal questions again. Are you a perfectionist?

 

Paul: Yes, I’m a perfectionist.

 

Blanka: If so, how does that express itself?

 

Paul: I’m a perfectionist but I’m someone that is still working on consistency I guess you could say.

 

Blanka: Let’s first define your perfectionism, what would you say is your perfectionism?

 

Paul: My biggest nightmare is a mediocre performance immediately. I’m a perfectionist in the way of really going through every phrase of the music and really deciding how one should execute it in the most convincing way.

 

Blanka: You are striving all the time to a perfectionist and which you probably never achieve, right?

 

Paul: No one achieves perfection.

 

Blanka: It’s a perfectionism that is a sort of goal that’s unachievable?

 

Paul: It’s the fuel that drives me forth. Technically it manifests itself also in my playing, intonation and all the stuff that’s important to proper, good playing. Musically, it’s still for me the pinnacle.

 

Blanka: Do you think that your perfectionism is positive or negative?

 

Paul: I think it’s positive because I don’t allow it to destroy myself. I don’t allow it to prevent me from enjoying my life at the same time.

 

Blanka: Because a study shows there are sort of two perfectionism; one that nothing is ever good. That’s the sort of negative, you are never satisfied and you turn into a grumpy depressed person. The positive one that’s always looking for the next moment to become better. I guess seeing your positive phase.

 

Paul: You are describing actually two moments of my life because I think everyone who is a perfectionist has gone through these phases, negative and positive relationship with his or her perfectionism. In my master’s degree I was very negative. Almost perpetually because I saw, I came from a smaller city and I went to a big centre for music in Europe. Not the biggest but definitely much bigger than where I came from. I realized just how much I had to attain, I had to achieve. It drove me forth but I think there was something missing in my playing in terms of musical sincerity and for lack of a better word love in my music because I was so negative all the time that affected me in a negative way.

 

Blanka: I can imagine.

 

Paul: Once I realized that that was actually hindering me and I let that go and I started enjoying my life again and enjoying what I did and enjoying the process of attaining a higher level of perfection, then all of a sudden I got much better. It’s all in your mind too.

 

Blanka: This, was there a teacher for you there or was that your own psychological insight or what made that turnaround, was it the moment or was it half a year that it took to change that attitude?

 

Paul: It wasn’t any teacher, sorry to say.

 

Blanka: Poor you.

 

Paul: No, my teachers, they are absolutely world-class teachers, both of them Lex Korff de Gidts and Kees Koelmans. I have great respect and admiration for them. They realized that I only had two years. They allowed me to take care of myself and they just drove me forth and always set the bar just at a reach. It was difficult but you are responsible for your own faculties. If you are negative all the time, that’s not the fault of another, that’s your own fault. Once I got out of school and I had time to find myself again outside of this technical machine, or factory that I was in, then I realized just what was going wrong, I guess you could say from a positive or negative mind-set.

 

Blanka: Here, you already touched the subject but just to be clear, did you benefit from it during your study, from your perfectionism?

 

Paul: Yes, greatly.

 

Blanka: In the technical part I guess.

 

Paul: Absolutely.

 

Blanka: Did you benefit from it during competitions?

 

Paul: Yes, but not on stage. Once one is on stage, one has to let go. If you’ve been practicing for months, and months and just pushing yourself constantly and you get on stage. To suddenly change that mind-set is not easy.

 

Paul: Performance is not work, performance is release. It’s letting go off everything you’ve worked

on.

 

Blanka: Then, actually we can conclude I guess that your perfectionism works against you during competition, during the moment of competing.

 

Paul: During the moment, absolutely.

 

Blanka: Very clear, thanks. As a teacher, are you using competitive elements in your own educational practice? If so, why?

 

Paul: Yes, but in a very subtle and nice way.

 

Blanka: Defensive already.

 

Paul: Yeah, I never, I have some principles as a teacher. I have a studio of thirteen pupils now in Haarlem at the De Vioolschool in Haarlem. It’s becoming a school of good level and I have my colleagues to thank for that. We work very well together. The level is going up, we have some new students in the last couple of years that have come in with a lot of talent and they are really making great strides. That’s setting the bar for the others. I uphold their level. I always challenge them on their level. I always speak in a positive way to them from, if you work on this piece or this etude or this concerto, then you’ll be able to work towards this piece, which is something they’ve always, “I’d like to do it,” they saw somebody that was better than playing. That is kind of like a positive way of competing without being competitive.

 

Blanka: Are you sometimes comparing your students against each other?

 

Paul: In my head sometimes. You are a human being.

 

Blanka: No, of course we all do that, but do you ever say, look at…?

 

Paul: No.

 

Blanka: It’s a taboo?

 

Paul: For me it is because I wouldn’t like that as a student either. I think in the end, the person you have to compete with is yourself, be the best version of yourself and not try to reach the level of another. When I was a student growing up I was in another type of environment. I was in very much a competitive environment and they were all my friends. When you are home, you are thinking, “I really want to reach that level.” That really drove me by comparing myself to others but it did give me a complex in the end because I started idolizing qualities that were in other students that I didn’t have.

 

Blanka: That’s very important. Can you repeat that again in a way that: if you are comparing yourself inside you are actually measuring yourself against qualities that are alien to you or not yours as an autonomous artist or how would you frame them?

 

Paul: Best I could give a little metaphor. It’s like a fox that looks at a Great Dane, a big dog, and idolizes how big and strong he is and wants to be that, but the fox will never be that. The fox has qualities the Great Dane doesn’t like being able to crawl into wholes and pick up bunny rabbits. The Great Dane is too big for that. What I’m trying to say is that you start idolizing things that you’ll never become or that are not in your personality. You may be able to imitate such things to a certain degree but they will not flow out of you naturally. Better to focus on what your strong points are and to work on the weaknesses that are around that to support your strengths.

 

Blanka: I understand. When came this realization? Again, I’m really interested in processes of transformation or process of change. I see you as a teenager or as that kid, that’s being a fox and compares himself to these dogs. Then at some point, you had to let go off that, you had to find your foxiness.

 

Paul: I have to say …(laugh)

 

Blanka: I see your face, you did that.

 

Paul: I found my foxiness!

 

Blanka: You did, but that transformation from comparing and trying to compete inside your head to getting into that own field, what happened there, can you remember, recall?

 

Paul: Yes. Not always the nicest experiences, failure on a performance level, now I’m speaking about competitions or maybe consolidation goals as you would have hoped. My also, just life experience, going through disappointments, maybe even a trauma, something that really brings you down to zero.

 

Blanka: Wakes you up …

 

Paul: Something that corners you in your life to the point that you have to look at yourself, you have to look at your weaknesses and your problems and you have to, it’s do or die moment so to speak. Those are often the most difficult moments of your life but they are the most valuable in hindsight because they really force you to accept who you are as a person. To really be real with yourself and then to know yourself better. Then from that point then you can start really start growing.

 

Blanka: Knowing this, would you say that you now deliberately look for these moments or you are just going in a direction and they happen or you hope that they will happen?

 

Paul: I think it’s a combination of both. I go my merry way every day. When I see a conflict now, I don’t, I try not to, of course we are all human but I try not to react in a defensive way immediately. I take a step back. I look, “What are they actually saying objectively, what is actually happening at this moment?” Not what I perceive through my emotion, because I am an emotional person, and then try to learn from it so that you can prevent it from happening the next time or you can deal with it in a different way the next time I guess you could say.

 

Blanka: Are your students competing between each other and how do you react to that?

 

Paul: Yes, but I have to say, I live in Haarlem and Haarlem and is really a wonderful city. It has its own unique culture apart from Amsterdam, apart from London. It’s in a way a bit of a paradise, especially for children. They have, it’s a beautiful friendly city, very low crime, almost no crime I would say from what I see. Also a city that has a wealth that is not struggling financially. The kids have a good life. They have a good upbringing and they learn, the majority of them learn to be very social and to socially interact with their colleagues. Of course there is an inner competition but it’s not in a mean way or in a …

 

Blanka: It’s friendly.

 

Paul: It’s friendly yeah. It’s encouraging I guess you could say.

 

Blanka: Are there winners and losers in your class, and how do you deal with those stigmas? A lot of kids that everyone thinks of winners or sort of losers.

 

Paul: There are some but I’ve never seen people express that in words.

 

Blanka: It’s very subtle?

Paul: It’s very subtle. I think perhaps a bit in body language. I think also one thing I really like about the Dutch culture is that people are much more down to earth and they call a spade a spade. They really, they don’t beat around the bush. I think even the ones that are struggling like for this new orchestra Het Clavis Ensemble that we started in October. It’s doing quite well. It’s like a step up between beginning playing and going to youth orchestra. It’s like, that’s what why we call it, it’s like the key to going for Clavis in Latin means the key. Anyway, there is a tension. Basically we have a few players in that orchestra that is actually under level of what we are looking for. We are giving them a chance to better themselves.

 

Blanka: They are the sorts of underdogs you would say.

 

Paul: Yeah, and they know it, and you see it in their body language often.

 

Blanka: How do you deal with those stigmas?

 

Paul: Positive feedback. In fact, I try to encourage them as much as I can. I demand a lot of them during rehearsal but then I bounce it with positive energy, when I see them doing something good I grab it immediately and I say, “Good job, you did this, look what kind of sound you are making now, look at that.” Really positive reinforcement but that is a very active activity. Positive reinforcement doesn’t work if you are a lazy bone.

 

Blanka: In your own class when you were studying, there were winners and losers I guess, how did you deal with the stigmas around you, from your colleagues?

 

Paul: When I was standing?

 

Blanka: Mmh-hmm (affirmative),

 

Paul: I was in another social environment, a very capitalist environment, very competitive. In a way there is that social control so people can really run their mouth a lot more in this environment. There have been moments where I’ve been very, doing the positive reinforcement or encouraging my colleagues that are maybe struggling a bit more than I. There have been other times where I’ve been really frustrated with their lackadaisical attitudes and I’ve kind of reeled into them during a repertoire class. I’ve had a few experiences where there was a student that she thought she was really great and record her once and you hear it’s a bit of a shock.

 

Blanka: You brought her down to earth?

 

Paul: It sounds horrible to say it this way but I basically, she was playing a Mozart excerpt for an audition and it was very rough. It sounded, it could have been Brahms or something like this. I really, I said it like it was. I said, “You sound like you are playing beats or Brahms and not Mozart’s, it doesn’t have the sparkling champagne quality. She took it really to heart and made a huge trauma about it.

 

Blanka: I can imagine.

 

Paul: I put my foot in my mouth because it was a very sensitive individual and I was not sensitive to the fact that she would not take that criticism the way I worded it properly.

Blanka: I understand. Very clear, thank you. Questions as a leader of an ensemble or a coach, how do you guide a potential winner if you consider yourself potential winners towards a competition?

 

Paul: That’s actually something we are dealing with right now in the school.

 

Blanka: If you have students would you think they could win?

 

Paul: I think a student that has exceptional talent, we, especially on the level that I’m teaching at, where most of my students are between ages eights and twenty one. I tend to drive them forth in a very steady pace. Really focusing on all the details, making sure that they have the most stable foundation possible and that is growing really well. Then eventually as teacher you should also know when it’s time to say goodbye.

 

Blanka: What is the importance of the stability?

 

Paul: The thing is, there are certain techniques, especially from a violin technique but from instruments you need to have all the holes in your techniques filled. All the different styles of bowing for example on the violin or different concepts of tempo, rhythm et cetera. These things have to be all there so that when you put a piece in front of them, they can read it, those things but also developing their voice on a basic level so that they have something to give other than technique. I think that’s also quite important. The best students, they have that already. They have that voice in them. The technique is then the most important part. We have one student that she’s nine years old and we think by the time she’s eleven, twelve, she’ll be doing the full playing or the young talent class in Amsterdam. It’s tricky to know how to draw …

 

Blanka: Guide.

 

Paul: Yes, it requires a lot, she hast two teachers, me and the owner of the school as well. The two of us are always having little meetings about her to make sure that we making the right decisions, repertoire, amount of repertoire, pace it where she goes because she can also get bored very easily being so brilliant.

 

Blanka: Yes, and young, so I can also imagine you want your adventures. You see how sensitive and precise observation actually the teacher needs to have. How do you lead your ensemble, the members of it towards competition if you are entering or doesn’t this apply to a situation you’ve been in?

 

Paul: It does apply. I have, hart half, we are on a break right now, a string trio, I had bearing trio and we were also for a time, for a competition we became a quartet. We had another violinist. We prepared ourselves as best as we could technically but also conceptually. All the phrases that everybody is thinking the same way. Then ensemble is very difficult because you have different people, people think in different ways. The whole process it build all those bridges so that we can all think the same way.

 

Blanka: Do you have a rehearsal without instruments for that, for instance, do you just really sit around the table?

 

Paul: Yeah.

 

Blanka: Very important to know.

 

Paul: Of course study is important, you are just talking about the music or you may be singing rhythms or phrases together but you don’t have to translate it into your instrument. It simplifies the process in some ways.

 

Blanka: How do you support someone who lost a music competition?

 

Paul: By reinforcing their positive qualities verbally.

 

Blanka: Again, shedding the light on …

 

Paul: Telling them also that the people that are sitting on the jury, they are five, six people that also have a limited experience in life and they are not, it’s not like the panel of the gods, the Pantheon.

 

Blanka: It might feel though…

 

Paul: They all put their pants on the same way. in the end it’s the collective judgment based on a certain perspective, but if you were to play the exactly same way in another competition there is a chance that it would be received completely differently.

 

Blanka: How do you support your ensemble and or its members when you suffer a loss, how do you recover from that with a group of people?

 

Paul: In the same way. Reinforcing what we have, what’s really good about us but also talking in a critical but positive way about what we can do to better ourselves. Always looking forward, not dwelling on the past, not getting stuck together.

 

Blanka: How do you implement a contest with the rest of an educational program?

 

Paul: How would I once again?

 

Blanka: Implement a contest: you have some goal for the contest and you have some goals for your growth or for your artistic imagination or I don’t know what you are working at. How do you combine these two worlds, the goals for a contest and the goals that you have as an educator for your student?

 

Paul: The commonality between them is technical prowess. Competitions, they support my pedagogy technically, stylistically also. The musical individuality that is something that is, I guess you could say the whip cream on the coffee cake, for many competitions in any case. I think it’s a more integral part of the whole process but in any case, from that standpoint technically and stylistically, it’s definitely, and they go hand in hand.

 

Blanka: Maybe you answered my next question already. How do you implement a contest in the rest of your ensemble’s creative process or rehearsals, do you really skip all the other stuff and just go for the contest or do you just make it a part of your overall artistic view that you are working on?

 

Paul: The competition level is often really high. If you are doing a competition really, 100% of your time as an ensemble is spent on that.

 

Blanka: Everything becomes focused on that?

 

Paul: Yeah, and I think especially with auditions to orchestras. I have periods of time where I have more concerts especially around passion season with the St Mathews passion, St John’s passion so forth. Then I have periods of time as many freelancers do where there are fewer concerts. Those are times to really prepare for auditions and competitions. Then I would spend daily my energies on that.

 

Blanka: How do you differentiate for your students’ collection of educational goals outside the competition? Even if you say, “Now we are going to prepare for a competition.” I think your students will still need to know that there is more that they need to learn,” that’s not included in the competition?

 

Paul: Yeah, students need to understand what a competition is. I think that’s the most important part. For me it was always difficult growing up because it was never spoken about what a competition actually is. Just that you have to do it and you have to be good.

 

Blanka: You have to win it.

 

Paul: You have to win it. That’s what it’s about, win a competition. There are many people that play competitions, five, six, seven and don’t win any and then all of a sudden they just start winning a lot. It’s a process. Especially when we are talking about orchestra auditions, freelancers that have finished their master’s. They are auditioning maybe ten, twenty times before they get a position. It’s a process. The student needs to understand that it’s a process and that it’s meant to benefit their technique, benefit their command of the instrument, of the repertoire and so forth. Winning, that is potluck, big parts playing, also mentality.

 

Blanka: I understand. Last question for this first part of our talk, how do you differentiate for your ensemble, a collection of goals outside of contest? Yo

 

Paul: Outside of competition?

 

Blanka: Yes.

 

Paul: That’s a fun part. All this creativity floating around. Artistic goals, what is our voice? How do we express ourselves together? That’s a combination of personalities. That makes you unique, every ensemble is unique because every ensemble is made up of unique individuals. I think for me the most important part now at this stage of my career is being as real as possible with yourself, accepting the good and the bad, and seeing how your colleagues fill you in on the bad bits. Moments where you have to take the lead, moments where the other takes the lead.
That’s where we talked about this also in our inter-think group in the performance that it’s not that there is one leader all the time, but that music demands that everyone is a leader at different times. That we are equals. Our goals outside of competitions. I would say that’s very much based on who we are and what we have to give because that is then the most sincere performance you could give. If you are trying to do something just for money sake, as a chamber musician, good luck, because it won’t last very long.

 

Blanka: For now, I would like to have a little musical intermezzo. Can you tell us what we will be hearing when we hear you play?

 

Paul: Sure, this is a recording actually of about three years back already. It’s a series of excerpts, I believe it’s three excerpts if I remember correctly from Cesar Franck’s Sonata piano and violin in A major. This is a recording I did with a good friend of mine and fantastic pianist David Herman who also studied in Amsterdam, finished just a bit earlier. Then the two of us had a duo for several years and played several concerts, piano violin together. This is one is in the Thomas kerk in Amsterdam. This is from Cesar Franck in A major sonata.

Musical Intermezzo: 46:23 – 49:58 excerpts Cesar Franck Sonata piano&violin in A major.

 

Blanka: Thank you for letting this be part of this talk.
I have more questions for you. Is there a difference between the evaluation system within your educational practice and that of competition and if so, what is that difference exactly?

 

Paul: Short answer would be, yes there is a difference. My evaluation and that of my colleagues at the school is much broader than just technique and style. It’s musical, also to see the wellbeing of the student, how that’s going because that has a large effect on how they play.

 

Blanka: Indeed! Was there a difference between the received educational assessments during your musical studies and that of musical contest? If so, what were those differences?

 

Paul: Yes, competitions tend to be a lot … How do I put this? It’s a good question. I think when you are, especially where I was coming from, I was in a fairly smaller environment, music here wasn’t huge and I was a big fish in a small pond. Then when you start doing competitions all of sudden you are taken out of your little pond and put in a big pond. Then you are held to a higher standard technically speaking. My technique was good. I was able to uphold that standard for the majority but it was often times compared to others perhaps a little bit underneath or less developed. It had to do with my environment I would say.

 

Blanka: Does the grading system within education, or those marks, function as a social selection tool in much the same way as does the classification of competition?

 

Paul: Yes, but I wouldn’t say that that is directly reflective of what the reality is. I would say that the process in general of giving marks is very important because it gives a very clear cut, black-white view of how a student is doing, but depending on how much a teacher likes you, you may get marks that are a little bit higher, a little big lower than what another would say. I wouldn’t say what reality is because reality, music especially is very subjective.
Another person would find your technique much lower. I’ve played competitions where I’ve done extremely well and they’ve really loved my playing and technique and then other one would say no. it’s absolutely not the level I want to see or they want to see a completely different type of technique, it’s also the case, different schools. It depends on who you are talking to I think.

 

Blanka: What do you as a teacher for your student when you disagree with a jury?

 

Paul: I haven’t really had a whole lot of experience with that to be honest with you.

 

Blanka: That’s coming I guess from your …

 

Paul: I think between colleagues we’ve had disagreements on how things should be done. So far we work, it’s really funny, we work so well that we have very rarely any sort of discussions, mostly that has to do with organization things in the school instead of how to send a student in a certain direction.

 

Blanka: What do you do as an ensemble leader when you don’t agree with the jury? There you are with your ensemble and you don’t agree with the jury, what’s next?

 

Paul: You take their comments for what it is and if you see, you look at it very critically and you try to draw as much positivity from it as possible in terms of what you can really do to improve yourself, then you let it go and you forget about it.

 

Blanka: What happens when you do agree with a jury, you as the ensemble leader but your ensemble members don’t?

 

Paul: Like with any difference of opinion.

 

Blanka: Yes, how do you go about it?

 

Paul: I express respectively how I feel, and I if I agree with the jury or not and then the others may have difference of opinion or slight differences of opinion and through discussion, conversation and number one, always showing respect for your colleagues, always showing respect and never talking over them or cutting them off or just really speak to them as you would somebody you give the respect. It works in fact, in conversations, it really does.

 

Blanka: I believe so.

 

Paul: People are convinced if you have an argument that is rational and that is directly correlative to the problem. People will eventually either see the light or you have a difference of opinion, you put it to rest.

 

Blanka: You work from there I guess. Last but not least, I will present statements which you can answer with agree, slightly agree, slightly disagree or disagree. Of course if you feel the need you may elaborate somewhat.

 

Paul: Somewhat.

 

Blanka: Society values competition as a vestige from our past, a true measure of value of earth.

 

Paul: Somewhat agree because society is changing so much. People are started, we are so networked globally now. People are starting to see how subjective a lot of things are.

 

Blanka: The strength of music competition lies in the stimulation, giving students to do their best.

 

Paul: Agree.

 

Blanka: Receiving a high score raises the spirit of the band and therefore acts as a stimulant.

 

Paul: Agree.

 

Blanka: Competitions are responsible for raising the level.

 

Paul: Level of what?

 

Blanka: Playing.

 

Paul: Somewhat agree, because it stimulates technique and style I would say more than musical originality.

 

Blanka: I will correct my question here in the iteration cycle.

 

Paul: Only if you’d like.

 

Blanka: Competition foster a large interest in music.

 

Paul: Somewhat agree.

 

Blanka: The idea of music competition is so successful because it brings out the natural instincts of rivalry and conquest.

 

Paul: What a lofty question?

 

Blanka: Glad you enjoy my hard work here. You heard my dynamics in the word natural instinct of rivalry and conquest.

 

Paul: I would say somewhat disagree.

 

Blanka: Competition can obstruct the educational process and as such hinder development.

 

Paul: Somewhat agree.

 

Blanka: The weakness of competition lies in the fact that winning may become an end in itself.

 

Paul: Agree.

 

Blanka: Winning the competition became the primary goal rather than improvement and learning?

 

Paul: Somewhat agree because it’s not always the case.

 

Blanka: Competition diffuses the difference between an athletic field and classroom.

 

Paul: Somewhat agree.

 

Blanka: Through competition, strife and jealousy are born and bred.

 

Paul: Agree. I do agree with this one.

 

Blanka: In competition the intention gets more focused on external forces like the rivals or the jury, rather than the performance at hand.

 

Paul: That depends on who you are of course. I think the people are successful with competitions, they are the ones that are not focused on that stuff.

 

Blanka: You disagree slightly or totally disagree?

 

Paul: I think I, because, if you look at whole picture, I would disagree.

 

Blanka: In adult life there is enough competition, rivalry and heated struggle during youthful development. There is no need to already participate.

 

Paul: Somewhat disagree, because I think if we try to harbor youth for as long as possible, they have a bigger shock when they hit the twenties. Reality is, life is competitive. If you want to be successful, you have to engage.

 

Blanka: In everyday life there is enough competition, rivalry and heated struggle, the art class should present a sanctuary.

 

Paul: It depends on what level you are playing or busy with your arts. I think if you are young that’s one thing that’s really strong about our school is that we tend to have, it’s a safe harbor, it’s a safe sanctuary, it’s a conservatory in a way for students to feel calm and comfortable. I think that that transition should be gradual.

 

Blanka: There is no need of a sanctuary outside society where competition is?

 

Paul: No, because I think music exists in society, with all the struggles and good points?

 

Blanka: An art class should be a place where everyone is judged by their own merits.

 

Paul: Could you clarify that?

 

Blanka: Yes, instead of in society were we are all compared, you have more or less comparing each other. The statement is that an art class should be a place where everyone is judged by their own merits without comparing those merits.

 

Paul: I agree with that because if …

 

Blanka: That fits more with the fox and the dog metaphor.

 

Paul: Absolutely, I agree with that because I think in the end, especially if you are a precise person that wants to do your best, the only person you can compete with is yourself.

 

Blanka: Comparing does not help the development of autonomy.

 

Paul: I agree.

 

Blanka: One of the main goals of art education is to develop mental for autonomy, comparing you inside.

 

Paul: Yes, in my philosophy I agree with that, yes.

 

Blanka: Students who do not achieve success in competition are unprepared to deal with the consequences of losing.

 

Paul: Of losing in general?

 

Blanka: No, of losing the competition.

 

Paul: I would slightly agree with that, although I think that tons of people even when they win they are not always very happy with how they do.

 

Blanka: All attention goes to the winners at the expense of taking care of the losers.

 

Paul: I agree with that.

 

Blanka: Thinking in the polarity of winners and losers should not have a place in art education.

 

Paul: I agree with that because music is becoming, competitions are becoming much more like the Olympics. Of course it takes away from the autonomy, the individuality. Although I would say that should not go to the expense of holding a golden standard, a high standard of technique. There should be role models, there should be mentors. Comparing one student to the next I think is only destructive.

 

Blanka: Art should be the antidote of the winners and losers’ mentality.

 

Paul: Art should be the antidote of winners and losers in society, absolutely not. I disagree. It goes against what art actually is.

 

Blanka: Joining a music contest is important as one learns good citizenship while improving motivation and public relations.

 

Paul: I would somewhat agree with that yes. I think it’s important to do some competitions to know really know what outs there, to know where you stand.

 

Blanka: A person taught to be highly competitive in an intergroup setting, one group against another group, may transfer the competitive feelings to members of his or her own group, the intergroup competition.

 

Paul: I think if the group works well together and they respect each other no, I don’t think so. I think they can push that. They can allow that not to poison the dynamic of the group.

 

Blanka: You disagree?

 

Paul: I disagree yeah.

 

Blanka: Competition has educational benefits for students including one, incentive for hard work, standard for performance and a good social education.

 

Paul: For competition, social education.

 

Blanka: Do you think those three are benefits, do you agree with that or slightly agree?

 

Paul: I slightly agree because I think in terms of social benefits, learning how to get along with everyone, I think the competition is actually putting a needed stress on the relationships between competitors, candidates, and actually even people that aren’t competing that are in the same circle that can cause also tension between the ones that decide to do competitions and the ones who don’t. There is an expectation perhaps on those that are not doing competitions to then also do what their colleagues are doing.

 

Blanka: Competition has educational drawbacks such as one, the stress competition creates may cause talented students to withdraw. Second, negative experiences might lead to unattainable perfectionism. Three, perfectionism can lead to burnouts and dropouts. Do you agree with that collection?

 

Paul: I’ll say somewhat agree because of course it’s all in how far you go, the more competitive. There is a balance that needs to happen. Of course if you are too much focused, if you are too fanatical about it, then other things can fall apart absolutely.

 

Blanka; When a competitive element is lacking, the level will drop.

 

Paul: That’s such a … I wish you didn’t ask this question.

 

Blanka: Everybody has been hurt here.

 

Paul: This is that nut sides where I think the competitions are important because they do uphold the standard yes, but it’s all in how you motivate the student. I didn’t do very many competitions in my life and I was always very motivated to achieve a high level. I achieved that through my own merits, not my parents … My family are not musicians. No one, I had only my colleagues surrounding me but I had no one in my family really pushing me. It depends on the person. I think someone that needs that kick in the butt, so to speak to do it, then yes, competitions are important for those people.

 

Blanka: Competitions are responsible for virtuoso result.

 

Paul: Often times, somewhat agree.

 

Blanka: Competitions compare students on incomparable qualities.

 

Paul: I agree and I’ll say this because at that level it’s subjective.

 

Blanka: Judgment in art and music competitions is comparing apples with pears.

 

Paul: These definitely get more difficult, the questions.

 

Blanka: Your silence is getting longer, that’s for sure.

 

Paul: Can I say yes and no?

 

Blanka: Yes, sure.

 

Paul: Yes, because as we spoke about earlier today, some students, their qualities are much different than others. You have the technical player that’s strong technically, that’s musically not so interesting. You have the very musically interesting person. That’s the apples and pears comparing.

 

Blanka: Somewhat agree?

 

Paul: Some agree I would say.

 

Blanka: Joining a music competition has the following advantage; one, the use of better music, two, the improvement of instrumentation, three, increased interest in school music by parents and students, four adjudicators’ comments, increased social context, student listen better to adult groups. Would you agree with this collection?

 

Paul: No, I would disagree with that. I think that the competition is a much narrower use today, focused on style and technique and not on all those things I would say.

 

Blanka: Joining a music competition has the following disadvantage and overemphasis on the competitive aspects, too much time spent on contest pieces, poor adjudication, hostility towards other fine ensembles performing at an event. Would you agree with this collection or disagree?

 

Paul: Performing at an event in what context?

 

Blanka: At first we had the increased social context and now we have the hostility towards others. Basically the negative drawback of competition, the disadvantage would be that people consider themselves enemies instead of colleagues or soulmates.

 

Paul: I would somewhat agree because I think in the context, and one thing I wanted to mention earlier was, I also see auditions for orchestras as competitions, which they are.

 

Blanka: Yes, they are.

 

Paul: Especially because they are very focused on technical playing and that you are flexible to do anything musically that the conductor or leaders require. I feel, every time I go to an audition I see all my colleagues that I play with in orchestras. Vast majority, I’ve played in musical orchestras. I don’t have any animosity towards them. I actually in the end, it’s the gods of this orchestra that will decide who is worthy. On our level, we are on the same boat. Why would you start shooting people on the same boat?

 

Blanka: Very clear, so you disagree or?

 

Paul: I disagree but I think in other social contexts, especially international competitions, yes.

 

Blanka: So somewhat disagree?

 

Paul: That’s why I said I somewhat agree, somewhat disagree, it depends on the context.

 

Blanka: Entering a competition means you must have a certain amount of competitive drive.

 

Paul: Absolutely agree with that. You can’t go in there with the lackadaisical approach.

 

Blanka: A diversity of goals during competition is expressed by the following thoughts; during competition I want to perform better than others.

 

Paul: For me I would disagree because that is not my motivation.

 

Blanka: During competition, I just want to avoid performing worse than others.

 

Paul: That is if you are not very secure in yourself, that is definitely something that you think of.

 

Blanka: This is about you, right?

 

Paul: About me.

 

Blanka: If you enter a competition, means you must have a certain amount of competitive drive. As you said, yes, then I go to the following. What are the four sort of motivational goal setting? One is the thought, “During competition I want to perform better than others.” You said no, you disagree with that one.

 

Paul: I think … I say no because I think you should not compare yourself to others. That is not a healthy way of doing things. especially if …

 

Blanka: That’s just what goes through your head is the question.

 

Paul: It does go through my head. It goes through my heat but it’s not something I allow to drive me. Because if I were to do that, then I would be sitting in the audience waiting for my turn to play, hearing the other person playing and just getting worried about, “They play this brilliantly.”

 

Blanka: I get it, very clear, thanks. The thought, during competition I just want to avoid performing worse than others.

 

Paul: That doesn’t go through my head as much because that is a bit a defeatist attitude.

 

Blanka: That’s where I got it from.

 

Paul: There you go.

 

Blanka: During competition I want to perform as well as I possibly can.

 

Paul: Yes, absolutely that’s right.

 

Blanka: That’s your thing.

 

Paul: I agree 100% yes.

 

Blanka: During competition I worry that I may not perform as well as I possibly can.

 

Paul: Absolutely.

 

Blanka: Thank you for this. Finally, the 2 last questions: what is your advice to students who are questioning whether or not to enter a music competition?

 

Paul: This is the most practical question you’ve asked for the day. Thank you for that. I would say, if you want to really put a push on your technique and really get technically and stylistically much better than what you were a couple of months, three months, four months ago, then absolutely do the competition.
Do not place your self-worth on how you do in the competition. Do not place your worth as an instrumentalist or as a musician on how you do in the competition because it’s an … You have to see it this way, it’s an opportunity to … It’s a door that if you fit in the right way you can go through. It’s an opportunity to really springboard your career, but it’s not the only way. I see it as more of an opportunity to better yourself as a person. If you’ve gotten to the point where you are really on top of your game and you know that you can compete at a level that you will win, then absolutely do that. If you keep plugging away at competitions just for the sake of, I have to win, I have to win, then it can defeat you.

 

Blanka: What is your advice to teachers and band leaders who coach students or their band members during competition, what you give us educators advice on what we should do when we are coaching?

 

Paul: Communicate in a very positive way all the time, whether it’s critique or positive reinforcement of good things that are already happening. Negativity will swell around in their heads. You are not good at this, you can’t do this, you have to work harder at this. This was actually a bit of my problem in my masters too because I did a lot of good things. majority of what I was doing was very good but I only heard negativity and not necessarily negativity presented in a nice way. that really, if you are a sensitive person …

 

Blanka: Which you are.

 

Paul: Which I am, that can defeat you if you are not careful.

 

Blanka: It did get to you or not?

 

Paul: Absolutely, yes.

 

Blanka: You had a struggle getting rid of it, or is it still playing a part in?

 

Paul: I think that ever experience you have in life is banked away in your mind. It’s just how you deal with it. I think that it’s, in some context it’s good for you, if you are getting a bit too confident that you can bring yourself back in balance again, one should never think too highly or too lowly of oneself, that’s basically what I’m getting at. A student that needs that positive reinforcement, especially when they are doing their first competition, the best thing that they could have is that energy that they can, on the states that they can just send that out to the jury, like look at what we can do. Even if it’s not perfect, at least you put your best foot forward, and that comes from positive reinforcement and very precise critique in a positive way.

 

Blanka: This makes a lot clear. Thank you very much Paul. I really liked this conversation. I hope the listeners have enjoyed it as well. Until the next time.

 

Paul: You are welcome. The pleasure was mutual.

 

Blanka: Till the next time, thank you.

 

 

 

 

Muziekwedstrijd, bij twijfel niet doen. Interview met Marjes Benoist. (nl)

Guest: Marjes Benoist – Head of the Sweelinck Academy for young talent at the conservatoire in Amsterdam.
Musical intermezzo: 28:30
Marjes Benoist plays Schumann Romance op. 28 #2 in F-sharp major.

In this third episode we will further examine competition in art education. Many art students, at some point, seem to ask themselves: should I or shouldn’t I enter an art competition? Music students are not an exception.

Are we as art and music educators actually preparing our students to compete with each other while we claim to focus our education on developing artistic autonomy and creativity? Is competing-comparing not mutual exclusive with autonomy?

 

Todays episode will again be in Dutch dealing with a Dutch situation. I’ll be interviewing Marjes Benoist on the ins and outs, the pro’s and cons of competition in music education.

 

Mijn gast van vandaag is Marjes Benoist. Op haar website staat te lezen:

…Op 15-jarige leeftijd vertrok Marjès naar Amsterdam om aan het conservatorium te gaan studeren bij Jan Odé, Jan Wijn en Hans Dercksen. Na haar examen in 1967 (summa cum laude) studeerde ze twee jaar in Rome bij Guido Agosti en twee jaar aan het Tsjaikovsky Conservatorium in Moskou…..(competities?)

Sinds 1991 is ze verbonden aan het Conservatorium van Amsterdam als hoofddocent piano en docent methodiek. Marjès heeft veelvuldig opgetreden als concertpianist en als soliste met orkest, zowel binnen Nederland als internationaal. Ze heeft talrijke recitals en muziektheater optredens gegeven, lezingen gehouden, en artikelen gepubliceerd in gerenommeerde muziektijdschriften.

Marjès is gespecialiseerd in het lesgeven aan jong talent en vervult al jaren de functie van hoofd van de Sweelinck Academie, de jong talent afdeling van het Conservatorium van Amsterdam. Veel van haar leerlingen hebben prestigieuze concoursen gewonnen en veroveren internationale podia.

 

Een paar leerlingen die Marjès in de afgelopen jaren begeleid heeft en hun artistieke verdiensten zijn

 

– Carter Muller won onder andere de Koninklijke Concertgebouw Orkest prijs voor jong talent in 2013.

 

– Richard Chang won o.a. in 2010 het pianoconcours van de Young Pianist Foundation in de categorie A.

 

– Noa Kleisen. Finaliste e-Piano Junior Competition, School of Music, University of Minnesota.

 

Aidan Mikdad won dit jaar op 14 jarige leeftijd de eerste prijs van de Premio Internazionale Pianistico “A. Scriabin” In 2014, won hij de eerste prijs van the International Piano Competition of Lagny-sur-Marne. En in 2013 won hij op 11 jarige leeftijd de eerste prijs van de Koninklijk Concertgebouw Competition.

Op zijn website staat te lezen: ‘Ik was niet echt serieus. Maar toen ik in de ban raakte van de pianomuziek van Dave Brubeck, vond mijn moeder het tijd worden voor een echte pianoleraar. Ze stuurde een mailtje naar Marjès Benoist…. Ik mocht bij haar voorspelen en toen werd ik haar leerling. Ik heb drie jaar privéles bij haar gehad en daarna deed ik toelatings- examen voor de Jong Talentenklas.

In een uitstekend interview op de blog van Olga de Kort, die ik iedereen die iets over talent begeleiden wilt begrijpen van harte kan aanbevelen staat:

 

Marjès’ specialiteit is het lesgeven en begeleiden van jong talent; kinderen (4-18jr) die een buitengewone aanleg hebben voor het instrument. Dit zijn niet per definitie kinderen die vanaf het begin het beste spelen, vaak gaat er heel wat aan vooraf wil het talent naar boven komen…..

….Marjes zegt daarin: Zonder een goede docent wordt een talent vaak niet eens herkend. Ik hoor vaak zeggen: “Jij hebt makkelijk praten want jij werkt uitsluitend met talenten”. En ik denk op mijn beurt dat er statistisch gezien op muziekscholen waarschijnlijk veel meer talent rondloopt dan ik in mijn leven heb gezien. Mijn leerling Aidan Mikdad zat eerst twee jaar op een muziekschool en werd daar helemaal niet tot de getalenteerden gerekend. Met hem ben ik ongeveer bij niets begonnen, hij moest zelfs nog leren noten lezen.

 

Ik was vanaf het begin docente aan de bachelor- en masteropleidingen en had aanvankelijk heel weinig met jonge leerlingen te maken.

Mijn belangstelling voor het jong talent heb ik vooral aan het Prinses Christina Concours te danken, waar ik ooit als jurylid werd gevraagd. Ik vond het een heel sympathiek concours waar je met deelnemers heel goed kon praten en veel feedback kon geven.

 

Ik mag n.a.v. deze quote dus aannemen dat je positief tegenover muziekwedstrijden staat?….

 

Marjes:…..

 

 

Ik quote nog eens Aiden’s website over het thema meedoen aan een muziekwedstrijd:

Wanneer hij weer aan concoursen gaat meedoen weet hij nog niet precies, want muziek is immers geen wedstrijd: ‘Muziek is niet echt een sport, zoals schaatsen. Je kunt niet precies op de lijn meten wie het beste speelt. Wat het ene jurylid een goede smaak vindt op het gebied van klankkleur of timing, is voor de ander weer niks. Dus het kan zo maar gebeuren dat je niet eens de eerste ronde haalt. Ik probeer mezelf altijd zo goed mogelijk voor te bereiden, zoveel mogelijk van mezelf af te laten hangen en gewoon mijn best te doen. Ik doe het omdat ik het leuk vind en niet om indruk te maken. Het goede aan concoursen is volgens mij dat
je je echt op één programma richt, dat je zelf kan samenstellen. Waarbij je jezelf dwingt om dat net zolang te spelen, totdat het helemaal perfect is. Dat is anders dan bij concerten. Het is veel intensiever en je kunt niet van je programma afwijken. Maar uiteindelijk speel ik op een een concours gewoon net zoals op een concert, want ik wil ook de jury graag laten horen hoe mooi de muziek is.’

Jij was op 16 maart nog prominente jurylid voor het Carla Leurs Concours

Is meedoen aan een muziekwedstrijd in het algemeen volgens jou een goede stap?

Voor mijn onderzoek volgen hier de algemene vragen:

  • Wat is het positieve en negatieve effect van competitie in muziekonderwijs?
  • Welke studenten hebben veel baat bij competitie in muziekonderwijs en welke studenten lijden onder competitie in muziekonderwijs?

 

De persoonlijke vragen:

  • Hoe sta je persoonlijk tegenover competitie in muziekonderwijs?
  • Wat zijn je persoonlijke positieve en negatieve ervaringen met competities in muziekonderwijs?
  • Welke aanpassingen zou je graag implementeren als jij het voor het zeggen had?

 

Als docent:

  • Gebruik je wedstrijdelementen in je eigen lespraktijk? Zo ja welke, waarom?
  • Vergelijk je weleens je studenten onderling? In positieve of negatieve zin? Waarom?
  • Gaan studenten weleens onderling een competitie aan? Hoe reageer jij daarop?
  • Zijn er ‘winners & losers’ in je klas? Zo ja, hoe ga je om met die stigma’s?

 

Muzikaal intermezzo…..

 

Als wedstrijd begeleider

–       Hoe begeleid je een potentiele winnaar naar een wedstrijd toe?

–       Hoe vang je een verliezer van een wedstrijd op?

–       Hoe implementeer je de wedstrijd in de rest van je lesprogramma?

–       Hoe onderscheid je voor je student diverse leerdoelen buiten de wedstrijd om?

 

Als beoordelaar

–       Is er verschil in het gehanteerde beoordelend systeem binnen je beroepspraktijk en die van de muziekwedstrijden? Zo ja, welk verschil is dat?

–       Is een cijfer systeem binnen het onderwijs net zo’n sociaal selectie middel als de classificatie van een wedstrijd?

–       Wat doe je als docent voor je student als je het niet eens bent met een jury?

–       Wat doe je als docent voor je student als jij het wel eens bent met een jury maar de student niet?

Last but not least:

Ik doe een aantal uitspraken en jij antwoord met

eens – beetje eens – beetje oneens – oneens.

 

De maatschappij waardeert wedstrijden als een canon vorming; als een meting van de echte waarde.

 

De kracht van wedstrijden ligt in de stimulans van studenten om hun best te doen.

 

Een hoge score ontvangen voelt goed voor de bandleden en werkt daardoor stimulerend.

 

Wedstrijden zorgen dat het niveau stijgt.

 

Wedstrijden zorgen voor een groter belangstelling voor muziek.

 

Het idee van een muziekwedstrijd slaat zo aan want het brengt het natuurlijke instinct van rivaliteit en verovering naar boven.

 

Wedstrijden kunnen een educatief proces en daardoor de ontwikkeling belemmeren.

 

De zwakte van wedstrijden is dat men zich sec gaat inspannen alleen om te winnen.

 

In een wedstrijd wordt winnen een belangrijker doel dan ontwikkelen en leren.

 

Wedstrijden maken het verschil tussen een atletiek veld en klaslokaal diffuus.

 

Wedstrijd, het woord zegt het al, doet strijd en jaloezie ontstaan en voedt deze.

 

Wedstrijden zorgen dat de aandacht meer gefocust is op externe factoren, zoals de rivalen of de jury, dan op de performance zelf.

 

In het volwassen leven is er al genoeg competitie, rivaliteit en verhit geworstel, de jeugd hoeft niet tijdens hun ontwikkeling hier al meteen aan meedoen.

 

In het dagelijkse leven is er al genoeg competitie, rivaliteit en verhit geworstel, het kunstklaslokaal zou juist een vrijplaats moeten bieden.

 

Het kunstklaslokaal zou een plek moeten zijn waar iedereen op zijn eigen kwaliteiten gewaardeerd wordt.

 

Zich vergelijken met anderen komt de ontwikkeling van de eigen autonomie niet ten goed.

 

In de kunsteducatie is het ontwikkelen van autonomie een belangrijk hoofddoel.

 

Studenten die niet succesvol zijn in een wedstrijd zijn niet voorbereid om de consequenties van ‘verliezen’ goed te verwerken.

 

Alle aandacht gaat uit naar de winnaars, ten koste van de zorg om de verliezers.

 

Het denken in ‘winners and losers’ zou geen plaats moeten hebben binnen kunst educatie.

 

Kunst zou de anti-dote moeten zijn van de ‘winners and losers’ mentaliteit.

 

Aan wedstrijden mee doen is belangrijk omdat je zo ook leert een ‘goed burger’ te zijn terwijl je je motivatie verhoogd en je public relations verbeterd.

 

Een person die erg competitief ingesteld is tegen andere teams/bands (intergroup rivaliteit) wordt dat evenzo makkelijk tegen zijn eigen team/bandleden (intragroup rivaliteit)

 

Wedstrijden hebben educationele voordelen

studenten werken harder

het niveau van de performance wordt hoger

het is ook goed sociaal onderwijs

 

Wedstrijden hebben educationele nadelen

De stress die wedstrijden met zich meebrengen zorgt ervoor dat bepaalde getalenteerde studenten afhaken

negatieve ervaringen kunnen tot onhaalbaar perfectionisme leiden

perfectionisme kan burn outs en drop outs tot gevolg hebben

 

 

Als er geen competitief element is dan verlaagd de standard

 

Wedstrijdelementen zorgen juist voor virtuoos effort

 

Wedstrijden vergelijken studenten op onvergelijkbare kwaliteiten.

 

Het juryren van kunst/muziek wedstrijden is het vergelijken van appels en peren.

 

Meedoen aan wedstrijden heeft de volgende voordelen:

1) leidt tot gebruik beter muziek

2) verbetering van het instrumentarium

3) verhoogde belangstelling voor school muziek van ouders en studenten

4) goede boordelingen – jury commentaar

5) vergroot social aspect, men luistert meer of beter naar andere groepen.

 

Meedoen aan wedstrijden heeft de volgende negatieve effecten

over benadrukking van het competitieve aspect

teveel tijd gespendeerd aan de wedstrijdstukken

slechte beoordelingen – jury commentaar

vijandelijkheid tegen andere geode performances van een wedstrijd.

 

De afsluiting:

Wat is je advies aan studenten die niet weten of ze wel of niet mee moeten doen met een wedstrijd?

Wat is je advies aan docenten die studenten begeleiden tijdens een wedstrijd?

Muziekwedstrijd, een goede mogelijkheid. Interview met MarnIX Dorrestein. (nl)

https://soundcloud.com/user-234384102/muziekwedstrijd-interview-met-marnix-dorrestein

Photo by Jerry van Vliet.

Todays episode will be in Dutch dealing with a Dutch situation. I’ll be interviewing Marnix Dorrestein on the ins and outs, the pro’s and cons of competition in music.

Mijn gast van vandaag is Marnix Dorrestein, opperhoofd van het electropopproject IX. Op zijn blog valt te lezen

Ik ben Marnix Dorrestein, geboren in Amsterdam op 1 Maart 1991.
Ik ben musicus, schrijf teksten, componeer en produceer muziek en naast maker ben ik ook een enorme muziekliefhebber.
In 2012 studeerde ik af aan de popopleiding van het Conservatorium van Amsterdam. Sinds 2013 doe ik een master aan diezelfde afdeling.

Onder de kop projecten is een lange lijst te vinden met:

Rest

En onder Rest las ik:

Het Nederlands Blazers Ensemble organiseert ieder jaar een wedstrijd voor jonge componisten. Degenen die de wedstrijd winnen mogen hun compositie uitvoeren met het Nederlands Blazers Ensemble tijdens het Nieuwjaarsconcert in het Concertgebouw…In 2004 won ik deze wedstrijd en dus mocht ik op 1 Januari 2005 in het Concertgebouw spelen.

Marnix toen ik jou de allereerste keer zag, zat je achter het drumstel in de Melkweg met je band Sheriff of Hong Kong mee te doen een de Grote Prijs van Nederland. Ik stemde op jullie en volgens mij wonnen jullie de publieksprijs en jij de prijs voor beste muzikant als ‘drummer’!

en dat klonk zo…2 min. Sheriff of Hong Kong live Grote Prijs van Nederland.

Tot mijn stomme verbazing zag ik je een jaar later in mijn klaslokaal zitten als gitaar student. En nog even een paar bands en projecten verder won je met je toenmalige band Uber-Ich de Grote prijs van Nederland. Dit jaar gaf je compositie les op popopleiding waar jezelf vorig jaar je master hebt afgesloten.

Ik hoef jou dus niet te vragen of je wel of niet mee moet doen aan muziekwedstrijden. Maar ik wil je wel graag ondervragen over je ervaringen en je meningen aangaande het competitie, het rivaliserende element in muziek. Zowel als ervaren muzikant en bandleider als beginnend docent.

De algemene vragen:

  • Wat is het positieve en negatieve effect van competitie in muziekonderwijs?
  • Welke studenten hebben veel baat bij competitie in muziekonderwijs en welke studenten lijden onder competitie in muziekonderwijs?

De persoonlijke vragen:

  • Hoe sta je persoonlijk tegenover competitie in muziekonderwijs?
  • Wat zijn je persoonlijke positieve en negatieve ervaringen met competities in muziekonderwijs?
  • Welke aanpassingen zou je graag implementeren als jij het voor het zeggen had?

Perfectionisme:

  • Ben jij een perfectionist?
  • Hoe uit zich dat? Sta je daar positief of negatief tegenover?
  • Heb je daar baat bij tijdens je studie?
  • Had je daar baat bij tijdens de wedstrijden?

Als student:

  • Zijn er wedstrijdelementen tijdens jouw muzieklessen gebruikt? Zo ja welke, waarom?
  • Werden studenten weleens onderling vergeleken? In positieve of negatieve zin? Waarom?
  • Gaan studenten weleens onderling een competitie aan? Hoe reageer jij daarop?
  • Waren er ‘winners & losers’ in je klas? Zo ja, hoe ga je om met die stigma’s?

Als docent:

  • Gebruik je wedstrijdelementen in je eigen lespraktijk? Zo ja welke, waarom?
  • Vergelijk je weleens je studenten onderling? In positieve of negatieve zin? Waarom?
  • Gaan studenten weleens onderling een competitie aan? Hoe reageer jij daarop?
  • Zijn er ‘winners & losers’ in je klas? Zo ja, hoe ga je om met die stigma’s?

muzikaal intermezzo IX nummer My Money is On You

https://www.facebook.com/whoisix/

 

Als bandleider-wedstrijd begeleider

–       Hoe begeleid je jouw band, dus je bandleden, naar een wedstrijd toe?

–       Hoe vang je jouw band dus je bandleden op als jullie verliezen?

–       Hoe implementeer je de wedstrijd in de rest van jullie creatief proces, repetitie?

–       Hoe onderscheid je voor je band repetitie doelen buiten de wedstrijd om?

Als beoordeelde

–       Was er verschil in het gehanteerde beoordelend systeem binnen je opleiding en die van de muziekwedstrijden? Zo ja, welk verschil was dat?

–       Heb je het cijfer systeem binnen het onderwijs als sociaal selectie middel net zo ervaren als de classificatie van een wedstrijd?

–       Wat doe je als bandleider als je het niet eens bent met een jury?

–       Wat doe je als bandleider als jij het wel eens bent met een jury (maar de bandleden bijvoorbeeld niet?

 

Last but not least:

Ik doe een aantal uitspraken en jij antwoord met

eens – beetje eens – beetje oneens – oneens.

De maatschappij waardeert wedstrijden als een canon vorming; als een meting van de echte waarde.

De kracht van wedstrijden ligt in de stimulans van studenten om hun best te doen.

Een hoge score ontvangen voelt goed voor de bandleden en werkt daardoor stimulerend.

Wedstrijden zorgen dat het niveau stijgt.

Wedstrijden zorgen voor een groter belangstelling voor muziek.

Het idee van een muziekwedstrijd slaat zo aan want het brengt het natuurlijke instinct van rivaliteit en verovering naar boven.

Wedstrijden kunnen een educatief proces en daardoor de ontwikkeling belemmeren.

De zwakte van wedstrijden is dat men zich sec gaat inspannen alleen om te winnen.

In een wedstrijd wordt winnen een belangrijker doel dan ontwikkelen en leren.

Wedstrijden maken het verschil tussen een atletiek veld en klaslokaal diffuus.

Wedstrijd, het woord zegt het al, doet strijd en jaloezie ontstaan en voedt deze.

Wedstrijden zorgen dat de aandacht meer gefocust is op externe factoren, zoals de rivalen of de jury, dan op de performance zelf.

In het volwassen leven is er al genoeg competitie, rivaliteit en verhit geworstel, de jeugd hoeft niet tijdens hun ontwikkeling hier al meteen aan meedoen.

In het dagelijkse leven is er al genoeg competitie, rivaliteit en verhit geworstel, het kunstklaslokaal zou juist een vrijplaats moeten bieden.

Het kunstklaslokaal zou een plek moeten zijn waar iedereen op zijn eigen kwaliteiten gewaardeerd wordt.

Zich vergelijken met anderen komt de ontwikkeling van de eigen autonomie niet ten goed.

In de kunsteducatie is het ontwikkelen van autonomie een belangrijk hoofddoel.

Studenten die niet succesvol zijn in een wedstrijd zijn niet voorbereid om de consequenties van ‘verliezen’ goed te verwerken.

Alle aandacht gaat uit naar de winnaars, ten koste van de zorg om de verliezers.

Het denken in ‘winners and losers’ zou geen plaats moeten hebben binnen kunst educatie.

Kunst zou de anti-dode moeten zijn van de ‘winners and losers’ mentaliteit.

Aan wedstrijden mee doen is belangrijk omdat je zo ook leert een ‘goed burger’ te zijn terwijl je je motivatie verhoogd en je public relations verbeterd.

Een person die erg competitief ingesteld is tegen andere teams/bands (intergroup rivaliteit) wordt dat evenzo makkelijk tegen zijn eigen team/bandleden (intragroup rivaliteit)

Wedstrijden hebben educationele voordelen

  1. studenten werken harder
  2. het niveau van de performance wordt hoger
  3. het is ook goed sociaal onderwijs

Wedstrijden hebben educationele nadelen

  1. De stress die wedstrijden met zich meebrengen zorgt ervoor dat bepaalde getalenteerde studenten afhaken
  2. negatieve ervaringen kunnen tot onhaalbaar perfectionisme leiden
  3. perfectionisme kan burn outs en drop outs tot gevolg hebben

 

Als er geen competitief element is dan verlaagd de standaard

Wedstrijdelementen zorgen juist voor virtuoos resultaat

Wedstrijden vergelijken studenten op onvergelijkbare kwaliteiten.

Het jureren van kunst/muziek wedstrijden is het vergelijken van appels en peren.

 

Meedoen aan wedstrijden heeft de volgende voordelen:

1) leidt tot gebruik beter muziek

2) verbetering van het instrumentarium

3) verhoogde belangstelling voor school muziek van ouders en studenten

4) goede boordelingen – jury commentaar

5) vergroot sociaal aspect, men luistert meer of beter naar andere groepen.

 

Meedoen aan wedstrijden heeft de volgende negatieve effecten

1) over benadrukking van het competitieve aspect

2) teveel tijd gespendeerd aan de wedstrijdstukken

3) slechte beoordelingen – jury commentaar

4) vijandelijkheid tegen andere geode performances van een wedstrijd.

 

Als je aan wedstrijden meedoet heb je een zekere mate van competitie drift.

 

Verschillende doelgerichtheid bij competitie drift uit zich als de volgende gedachte:

  • Tijdens een wedstrijd wil ik beter zijn dan de anderen
  • Tijdens een wedstrijd wil ik vooral niet minder zijn dan anderen?
  • Tijdens een wedstrijd wil ik vooral het beste uit mijzelf halen
  • Tijdens een wedstrijd maak ik me zorgen dat ik niet zo goed presteer als dat ik zou kunnen

 

Als afsluiting:

Wat is je advies aan studenten die niet weten of ze wel of niet mee moeten doen met een wedstrijd?

Wat is je advies aan docenten en bandleiders die studenten begeleiden tijdens een wedstrijd?

ix

Muziekwedstrijd, wel of niet meedoen. Interview met Jack Pisters (nl)

https://soundcloud.com/user-234384102/muziekwedstrijd-wel-of-niet-meedoen-interview-met-jack-pisters

photo by courtesy: Walter Goyen. www.H4P.com

This episode will be in Dutch dealing with a Dutch situation. I’ll be interviewing Jack Pisters on the ins and outs, the pro’s and cons of competition in music education. Many art students, at some point, seem to ask themselves: should I or shouldn’t I enter an art competition? Music students are not an exception.

Are we as art and music educators actually preparing our students to compete with each other while we claim to focus our education on developing artistic autonomy and creativity? Is competing-comparing not mutual exclusive with autonomy?

Mijn gast van vandaag is Jack Pisters, initiator en leider van de popopleiding van het Conservatorium van Amsterdam.

Zelf begenadigd gitarist. In 1983 won hij op 17 jarige leeftijd bij een landelijke KRO wedstrijd als één van de jongste deelnemers met zijn gitaarsolo Arabesque de gitaar van Gary Moore.

Om maar met andermans woorden te beginnen, een quote van Rob Kietselaer uit gitaarschoolnederland.nl gitaar – juni 2015.

“Veel studenten die op de pop afdeling hun studie volgden hebben nu begerenswaardige prijzen in hun kast staan. Om maar wat te noemen: tientallen bands waren 3FM Serious Talent en een even zo groot aantal speelden in De Popronde, drie werden Amsterdamse Popprijs-winnaars, dertien keer wonnen ze de Grote Prijs van Nederland in verschillende categorieën en drie keer de Sena Pop NL Awards. Bij de laatste is hij ook zelf betrokken, als organisator en soms als jurylid, maar ook als begeleider om te zorgen dat de winnaars met de goede mensen in contact komen en de goede stappen zetten.”

Daar zijn we dan direct bij het kern van het thema: is meedoen aan een muziekwedstrijd een goede stap?

Hier volgen alle vragen die ik Jack Pisters gesteld heb.

De algemene vragen:

  • Wat is het positieve en negatieve effect van competitie in muziekonderwijs?
  • Welke studenten hebben veel baat bij competitie in muziekonderwijs en welke studenten lijden onder competitie in muziekonderwijs?

De persoonlijke vragen:

  • Hoe sta je persoonlijk tegenover competitie in muziekonderwijs?
  • Wat zijn je persoonlijke positieve en negatieve ervaringen met competities in muziekonderwijs?
  • Welke aanpassingen zou je graag implementeren als jij het voor het zeggen had?

Als docent:

  • Gebruik je wedstrijdelementen in je eigen lespraktijk? Zo ja welke, waarom?
  • Vergelijk je weleens je studenten onderling? In positieve of negatieve zin? Waarom?
  • Gaan studenten weleens onderling een competitie aan? Hoe reageer jij daarop?
  • Zijn er ‘winners & losers’ in je klas? Zo ja, hoe ga je om met die stigma’s?

Als wedstrijd begeleider

–       Hoe begeleid je een potentiele winnaar naar een wedstrijd toe?

–       Hoe vang je een verliezer van een wedstrijd op?

–       Hoe implementeer je de wedstrijd in de rest van je lesprogramma?

–       Hoe onderscheid je voor je student diverse leerdoelen buiten de wedstrijd om?

Als beoordelaar

–       Is er verschil in het gehanteerde beoordelend systeem binnen je beroepspraktijk en die van de muziekwedstrijden? Zo ja, welk verschil is dat?

–       Is een cijfer systeem binnen het onderwijs net zo’n sociaal selectie middel als de classificatie van een wedstrijd?

–       Wat doe je als docent voor je student als je het niet eens bent met een jury?

–       Wat doe je als docent voor je student als jij het wel eens bent met een jury maar de student niet?

 

Last but not least:

Ik doe een aantal uitspraken en jij antwoord met eens – beetje eens – beetje oneens – oneens.

De maatschappij waardeert wedstrijden als een canon vorming; als een meting van de echte waarde.

De kracht van wedstrijden ligt in de stimulans van studenten om hun best te doen.

Een hoge score ontvangen voelt goed voor de bandleden en werkt daardoor stimulerend.

Wedstrijden zorgen dat het niveau stijgt.

Wedstrijden zorgen voor een groter belangstelling voor muziek.

Het idee van een muziekwedstrijd slaat zo aan want het brengt het natuurlijke instinct van rivaliteit en verovering naar boven.

Wedstrijden kunnen een educatief proces en daardoor de ontwikkeling belemmeren.

De zwakte van wedstrijden is dat men zich sec gaat inspannen alleen om te winnen.

In een wedstrijd wordt winnen een belangrijker doel dan ontwikkelen en leren.

Wedstrijden maken het verschil tussen een atletiek veld en klaslokaal diffuus.

Wedstrijd, het woord zegt het al, doet strijd en jaloezie ontstaan en voedt deze.

Wedstrijden zorgen dat de aandacht meer gefocust is op externe factoren, zoals de rivalen of de jury, dan op de performance zelf.

In het volwassen leven is er al genoeg competitie, rivaliteit en verhit geworstel, de jeugd hoeft niet tijdens hun ontwikkeling hier al meteen aan meedoen.

In het dagelijkse leven is er al genoeg competitie, rivaliteit en verhit geworstel, het kunstklaslokaal zou juist een vrijplaats moeten bieden.

Het kunstklaslokaal zou een plek moeten zijn waar iedereen op zijn eigen kwaliteiten gewaardeerd wordt.

Zich vergelijken met anderen komt de ontwikkeling van de eigen autonomie niet ten goed.

In de kunsteducatie is het ontwikkelen van autonomie een belangrijk hoofddoel.

Studenten die niet succesvol zijn in een wedstrijd zijn niet voorbereid om de consequenties van ‘verliezen’ goed te verwerken.

Alle aandacht gaat uit naar de winnaars, ten koste van de zorg om de verliezers.

Het denken in ‘winners and losers’ zou geen plaats moeten hebben binnen kunst educatie.

Kunst zou de anti-dote moeten zijn van de ‘winners and losers’ mentaliteit.

Aan wedstrijden mee doen is belangrijk omdat je zo ook leert een ‘goed burger’ te zijn terwijl je je motivatie verhoogd en je public relations verbeterd.

Een person die erg competitief ingesteld is tegen andere teams/bands (intergroup rivaliteit) wordt dat evenzo makkelijk tegen zijn eigen team/bandleden (intragroup rivaliteit)

 

Wedstrijden hebben educationele voordelen

studenten werken harder

het niveau van de performance wordt hoger

het is ook goed sociaal onderwijs

 

Wedstrijden hebben educationele nadelen

De stress die wedstrijden met zich meebrengen zorgt ervoor dat bepaalde getalenteerde studenten afhaken

negatieve ervaringen kunnen tot onhaalbaar perfectionisme leiden

perfectionisme kan burn outs en drop outs tot gevolg hebben

 

Als er geen competitief element is dan verlaagd de standaard.

Wedstrijdelementen zorgen juist voor virtuoos resultaat.

Wedstrijden vergelijken studenten op onvergelijkbare kwaliteiten.

Het juryren van kunst/muziek wedstrijden is het vergelijken van appels en peren.

 

Meedoen aan wedstrijden heeft de volgende voordelen:

1) leidt tot gebruik beter muziek

2) verbetering van het instrumentarium

3) verhoogde belangstelling voor school muziek van ouders en studenten

4) goede boordelingen – jury commentaar

5) vergroot social aspect, men luistert meer of beter naar andere groepen.

 

Meedoen aan wedstrijden heeft de volgende negatieve effecten

over benadrukking van het competitieve aspect

teveel tijd gespendeerd aan de wedstrijdstukken

slechte beoordelingen – jury commentaar

vijandelijkheid tegen andere geode performances van een wedstrijd.

 

De afsluiting:

Wat is je advies aan studenten die niet weten of ze wel of niet mee moeten doen met een wedstrijd?

Wat is je advies aan docenten die studenten begeleiden tijdens een wedstrijd?

 

Deze uitzending werd mogelijk gemaakt door Music Matrix Studio

Sound engineer Jaap van der Kleijn

Dank aan de luisteraars.

Competition, is Music Education the loser? The three myths

Extract from Competition, is Music Education the loser by James R. Austin published in Music Educators Journal February 1990 vol. 76 no. 6 21-25

Why do we compete?

Frank A. Beach, one of the founders of early school music contests in the USA, suggested that the purpose of contests was “not to win a prize but to pace one another on the road to excellence.”

Is competition a worthwhile educational tool, or does competition, by its very nature, undermine the learning process?

Does competition provide all students with a healthy experience, or are some students destined to flounder under such setups?

If structured contests and other forms of competition are not the answer, to what other educationally viable alternatives can music educators turn in their daily efforts to attract students to music courses, to motivate students to practice, and to maximize student achievement? (Austin,

The myths of competition


The expression “A little healthy competition never hurt anyone” mirrors our common belief that competition is an effective means of generating student interest, stimulating students toward higher levels of achievement, measuring students’ achievement in relation to that of other competitors, and preparing students for the eventualities of winning and losing in the real world. Surveys of public attitudes toward music competition confirm this; contests and other forms of competition are perceived as being valuable, if not essential, experiences for music students, and many directors feel a pressure to be competitive in relation to other school music programs. (Burnsed&Sochinski, 1983)

Kohn argues, however, that many of our beliefs about competition are based more on folk wisdom than on scientific fact. Among the myths that he attacks are the ideas that

1) competition is inevitable as a part of our human nature;

2) competition motivates us to do our best;

3) learning to compete builds character and self-confidence.

(Kohn, 1986)

The inevitability myth


The more avid proponents of competition often point to the pervasiveness of competition in our society as convincing evidence that being competitive is part of human nature and that a predisposition to compete must somehow be essential for survival and advancement as human beings.

Bil Gilbert, who has examined society’s fascination with competitive athletics, suggests that most people view competition as the “behavioral equivalent of gravity”-a necessary force guiding each individual to his or her proper niche in the world. (Gilbert, 1988)

Kohn counters that our fetish for competition is not innate but is, rather, a learned behavior. We perpetuate our belief in competition, he contends, by teaching our children to compete as we did and then citing the competitiveness of our children as proof that competition is inevitable. Blinded by this circular pattern of reasoning, we easily overlook the many interdependent aspects of living that are integral to survival in our own society, as well as the many foreign cultures that are clearly more cooperative than competitive in nature. Kohn adds that individuals who rely most heavily on the human nature argument are often those who have benefited from competition in the past and who will benefit from maintaining the status quo in the future.

The motivation myth

Many individuals propose that competition motivates us to do our best and that without competition we would wallow in a sea of mediocrity. Kohn, however, cites an impressive and growing body of research literature indicating that competition does not improve performance quality. Moreover, on complex tasks that require higher order thinking skills (such as creativity or problem solving), competition may actually interfere with learning and subsequent achievement.

The large gap between research findings and our intuitive beliefs on this matter might be explained as a difference in perspective. Competition connoisseurs are naturally drawn to the excitement and thrill of victory that surround extraordinary performances and winning performers. Researchers, on the other hand, generally concern themselves with larger populations that include not only elite performers but also average and struggling performers-individuals who often flounder under competitive conditions and bring the average performance score back down to earth in school achievement studies. (Austin,19..)

Martin Maehr, a presenter at the third session of the Ann Arbor Symposium on Motivation and Creativity, cautioned music educators about this phenomenon: “There is a tendency in music education to place elites and regulars on the same track, designing the system in such a way that most will inevitably fall by the wayside with only the cream of the crop surviving.

Competitions, contests, and recitals all seem to revolve around that end …. One does not create enduring motivational patterns by showing people that they are incompetent. Insofar as an activity is structured to do that, it will be a motivational failure for the large majority of the participants.” (Maer, 1983)

The character-building myth

Kohn states that feelings of competence are central to each individual’s self-esteem. “Competence” can be defined, most simply, as doing well in relation to some accepted standard of performance. Yet, many people confuse the term competence with “competitive success” or “winning.” These ideas are not analogous. It is quite possible to display competence without engaging in competitive behavior (for example, the master craftsman working in isolation). Conversely, one might enjoy competitive success (winning a swimming event) without attaining a desired level of competence (surpassing a previous best time by five seconds).

In Kohn’s view, our society tends to place greater emphasis on winning than on the demonstration of competence.

Notes:

James R. Austin, Competition, is Music Education the loser?  Music Educators Journal February 1990 vol. 76 no. 6 21-25

Vernon Burnsed and James Sochinski, Research on Competition.” Music Educators Journal 70, no 20 (October 1983), 25-27

Alfie Kohn, No Contest: the case against competition (Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1986)

Bill Gilbers, “Competition, Is It What Life’s All About?” Sports Illustrated 68, no 20 (May 16 a988), 88

Martin L. Maer, “The Development of Continuing Interests in Music.” in Motivation and Creativity (Reston, VA: Music Educators National Conference, 1983) 10

 

Competition: the four cornerstones

Final excerpt – Competition in Music in the Twentieth Century by Rohrer. P. Thomas (2012) 

The four cornerstones for my own thesis research.

Some perceive competition as a motivator that drives the participant to a higher level of achievement. Kohn, however, contended that “competition is fundamentally an interactive word, like kissing, and it stretches the term beyond usefulness to speak of competing with oneself.” (Kohn,)

Competition may produce positive and negative effects, depending on the circumstances surrounding the contest. Supporters argue that group competition develops “citizenship” skills of discipline and cooperation needed for the challenges of adult life. Some argue that intergroup competition (between groups) may foster cooperation within the groups, but without careful planning and supervision, competitive habits may transfer to the intragroup setting. (Friedman, 1983 p 28)

While often competition appears to be equally capable of generating a negative type of interaction among students that, especially for those experiencing repeated failure, may lead to diminished performance, anxiety, avoidance behavior, loss of self-esteem, decreased interest, or discontinued involvement in some task or activity.” (Austin, 1988)

“The competitive situation is one in which reinforcement is prescribed on the basis of a subject’s behavior relative to that of other individuals; while the cooperative or less-competitive situation involves working in harmony to achieve a mutually agreeable end. The person engaged in competition is concerned with winning, while the goal of winning need not be present under cooperative conditions. (Coleman, 1976, p xii)

Notes:

Alphie Kohn, No Contest: The Case against Competition (Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin Company,1986)p. 6

Marilyn R. Freedman, “Achievement Motivation, Future Orientation, and Intragroup versus Intergroup Structure: The Determinants of Level of Individual Performance in Groups” (Ph.D. diss., Ohio University, 1983), p. 28.

James R. Austin, “Competitive and Noncompetitive Goal Structures: An Analysis of Motivation and Achievement Outcomes among Elementary Band Students” (Ph.D. diss., University of Iowa, 1988), p. 10.

Don Verlin Coleman, “Biographical, Personality, and Situational Determinants of Leisure Time Expenditure: With Specific Attention to Competitive Activities (Athletics) and to More Cooperative Activities (Music)” (Ph.D. diss., Cornell University, 1976), p. xii.

Music contests: the pros and cons

Attitudes toward Music Contests: the pros and cons:

Society values competition as a vestige from our past—a “true” measure of value or worth. Modern research points to the havoc that competition can create in the educational or developmental process.
Its strength lies in the stimulation given students to do their best. Its weakness lies in the fact that winning may become an end in itself.
Receiving a high rating makes the band feel good. Winning often became the primary goal rather than improvement and learning.
Contests raises standards of performance. Difficult to see where the athletic field ends and class room begins.
Contest raises the spirit of the band. Jealousy is born, strife is bred.
Fostering an at-large interest in music. Competition focuses attention and energy on an external force— the fellow competitor—rather than the performance at hand.
The idea [of music contests] is successful because it brings out the instincts of rivalry and conquest. There is enough of heated struggle in life without deliberately and unnecessarily fanning the spark in childhood
The importance of learning “citizenship” through a competitive music program while improving motivation and public relations. Concern for those students who do not achieve success in competition and are unprepared for the consequences of losing.
Competition has educational benefits for students including: 1) incentive for hard work, 2) a standard for performance 3) a good “social education. A person taught to be highly competitive in an intergroup setting (one group united against another) may transfer the competitive feelings to members of his/her own group (intragroup competition).
Fear about reduction of standards with the removal of competitive element. The stress of competition may cause children to avoid involvement altogether.
Contests defended on the basis of its ability to elicit virtuoso effort. Negative experiences can lead to an “overconcern for perfection” that cause students to drop out.
(1) the use of better music, (2) the improvement of instrumentation, (3) increased interest in school music by parents and students, (4) adjudicators’ comments, and (5) the opportunity for students to hear other groups 1) an overemphasis on the competitive aspect, 2) too much time spent on festival pieces, 3) poor adjudication, 4) de-emphasis of the other fine ensembles performing at an event.

 

Attitudes towards music contest – part III (survey)

Excerpt – Competition in Music in the Twentieth Century by Rohrer. P. Thomas (2012) part III

The Critics of Competition

From the inception of contests, the main concern was the abuse of the system by adults who might foster a “win-at-all-costs” attitude. In a 1953 study of band adjudication in competition- festivals, Bell concluded that winning often became the primary goal rather than improvement and learning. (Bell, 1953)

A study by Ames from the same decade suggested that tension, pressure and rivalry might be eliminated, particularly from smaller schools, by the use of a festival-type format without the competitive element. (Ames, 1950)

Regarding band contests in general, Neil found four major criticisms (Neil, 1944);

1) an overemphasis on the competitive aspect,

2) too much time spent on festival pieces,

3) poor adjudication,

4) de-emphasis by the director of the other fine ensembles performing at an event.

Kohut expressed particular concern for those students who do not achieve success in competition and are unprepared for the consequences of losing.(Kohut, 1985)

The passionate pleas of many educators over the past eighty-odd years of band competition appear in one paragraph written in 1925 by Carl Engel:

“The idea [of music contests] is successful because it brings out the instincts of rivalry and conquest. There is enough of heated struggle in life without deliberately and unnecessarily fanning the spark in childhood. … In any prize contest there must needs be a winner, or a small number of winners, and a great many losers. Jealousy is born, strife is bred.” (Engel, 1925)

Summary

Controversy has surrounded U.S. music contests from their inception. Many studies surveyed opinions of band directors, students, administrators, and parents, but the inability to reach a consensus on the role of contests caused a philosophical schism within the music teaching community and a resulting inconsistency from one school to another.

Proponents of contests continue their support in present times, citing the same benefits that inspired the original music competitions. They argue that, aside from fostering an at-large interest in music, competition has educational benefits for students including

  • incentive for hard work,
  • a standard for performance
  • a good “social education.

Supporting educators stress the importance of learning “citizenship” through a competitive music program while improving motivation and public relations.

Notes

Cecil Charles Bell, Jr., “A Study of the Development of the Competition-Festival in Its Relationship to Band Adjuducation” (M.M. thesis, University of Texas, 1953), as cited in Donald D. DeuPree, “An Analysis of the Colorado Large Group Musical Competition-Festival System,” p. 14.

William Howard Ames, “A Survey of Public High School Music Teachers’ Opinions Concerning Competitive Music Festivals in the State of Washington” (M.A. thesis, State College of Washington, 1950), p. 34.

Ronald J. Neil, “The Development of the Competition-Festival in Music Education” (Ph.D. diss., George Peabody College for Teachers, 1944), p. 119.

Daniel L. Kohut, Musical Performance: Learning Theory and Pedagogy (Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall, 1985), p. 93.

Carl Engel, “Views and Reviews,” Musical Quarterly XI, no. 3 (1925): 628.

« Older posts

© 2016 Blanka Pesja

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑